THFP Archive: Halloween Party Craft – Costume Frames

Are you the parent in charge of your child’s class party craft? This is one of my favorite craft ideas that a parent did in my classroom. It’s a Halloween costume picture frame.


First, parent volunteers take pictures of the students in their Halloween costumes. Then, a parent uploads the photos to a computer and sends them to a one hour processing store. The pictures are picked up after the hour and brought back to school. During the party, the kids assemble craft-stick picture frames (directions here). They can color or paint them and add embellishments. A magnet is added to the back so that it can be hung on the refrigerator. When the pictures return to the school, the children’s pictures are put in their frames to take home.

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Related Posts:

Clever Halloween Costumes For Kids

Pumpkin Decorating Party Idea-Harvest Social/Halloween Party

Halloween Party Treat Idea: Nilla Wafter Acorns

Thanksgiving Poetry

PTA/PTO Fundraising Idea For A Reading Program

SNAP

Is your school’s PTA/PTO looking for ways to support your teachers this school year?  Here is a program that teachers will appreciate and will help students increase their reading skills.  It’s called SNAP! Learning.  SNAP! is an individualized reading program aligned to the Common Core standards that has over 133 engaging books and scripted lesson plans offering instruction and practice in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.  It covers K-6 content in history, science, and language arts. The materials are appropriate for struggling readers, English language learners, advanced or gifted students, and kids reading at grade level.

Teachers have such a wide variety of learning needs and levels in their classrooms, that sometimes it can be tricky to meet every child’s need.  This program would make it easier for kids to learn at their own level through out the school day.  Teachers can track students’ performances with online assessments, tools, and charts.  They can see if the students comprehend what they read, how many words they read correctly, and more valuable information with online reports.

SNAP! is perfect for our technology-rich world that appeals to kids.  While its lessons and practice reading books library can be printed out for children to use, children can also view them on an iPad, Kindle Fire, Android, computer, or classroom Smartboard.

The yearly cost for an entire classroom of students is $89 a year.  This cost includes everything for all of the students: printed books, ebooks, lessons, assessments, etc.  I can see this program as a valuable PTA/PTO fundraising goal for the school.   It would be worth it to help meet all students’ needs.

You can win one of these 3 iPad apps.
Apps will be awarded randomly to the winners.

 App Measurement Kandy Fish
 Word Wall  Measurement

Kandy Fish

SNAP! Learning has provided 3 lucky readers of Teacher Help For Parents a code for a FREE iPad app from Punflay.  You will either win Word Wal, Measurement, or Kandy Fish.  Punflay has great educational apps for kids.  You can enter below.  Contest ends on October 2nd at 12:00 a.m.

Congratulations to our winners.  An email has been sent to you.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

More Resources

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

Reading Fluency: Increasing Speed and Expression

How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension? (Free Reading Comprehension Printables)

Motivating Your Child To Read

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I received three free apps to give to my readers and a free, limited time, preview from SNAP!

 

The Importance Of Adjectives: Using Specific Adjectives

The Importance Of Adjectives - Using Specific Adjectives FREE PRINTABLE-


While reading Old Hat New Hat by Stan and Jan Berenstain, it occurred to me that this would be a great book for reinforcing adjectives. The book begins with a bear going into a hat store to find a new hat, but each hat is either too bumpy, too pointed, too big, too scratchy, etc. Explain to your child that adjectives describe nouns (in this case hats). Read the book with your child pointing out the adjectives as you read. Help your child understand that using specific adjectives when they write helps the reader to see in his or her mind what your child sees. If your child were to leave out the adjective or use one that’s not specific, the reader could see something completely different than what your child intended. Adjectives help to paint the picture in the reader’s mind.

After reading the book and discussing the importance of adjectives with your child, have your child come up with another object to describe. For example, they could describe a favorite teddy bear. Then have your child list adjectives that could describe the teddy bear. From the list, have your child choose three adjectives. Then have him or her draw three teddy bears using a different adjective with each bear. Show them that when they change the adjective, the picture changes as well. The same thing happens with the picture in the reader’s mind when you use adjectives.

The Importance Of Adjectives - Using Specific Adjectives FREE PRINTABLEFree Adjective Printable

If your child keeps a writing journal (which I highly recommend), have them choose an entry and add adjectives to his or her writing.

Extension: This book can also be used to reinforce the word “too” and its use.

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More Resources:

Teaching Prepositions Through Writing and Play (Free Printable)

The Importance of Writing Journals

Thanksgiving Poetry (Free Printables)

Writing: St. Patrick’s Day Limericks (Free Printable)

Spelling OI/Oy Words

Mother’s Day Poem Heart Card (Free Printable)

Father’s Day Writing Activity: My Dad News (Free Printable)

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

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Picture background by http://mycutegraphics.com.

How To Request A Learning Disability Test For Your Child

How To Request A Learning Disability Test For Your Child

If it seems your child is falling behind in school and is having a hard time understanding what is being taught, meet with your child’s teacher to determine what could be done to help. Often, additional help or accommodations are all that is needed to help your child be successful in school. A teacher may also ask to begin the RTI process for your child if other ways to help are not working. This means that the teacher, you, and other school personnel will meet together throughout the year to monitor the progress of your child and discuss further accommodations. Sometimes this may be an extra math or reading class, one-on-one time, or modifications. If these ideas do not work, and the school personnel think your child may qualify, your child could be tested for a learning disability. Click here to see the full RTI Process.

There may be a time when you feel your child needs to be tested for a learning disability sooner than later. If this is the case, there are legal rights that parents have to get their child tested sooner. According to the IDEA regulations, a parent may request an initial evaluation to determine if the child is a child with a disability.

IDEA Regulations (from idea.ed.gov):

1. Add a provision regarding initiation of a request for initial evaluation. Consistent with the consent requirements in 34 CFR 300.300, either a parent of a child or a public agency may initiate a request for an initial evaluation to determine if the child is a child with a disability.
[34 CFR 300.301(b)] [20 U.S.C. 1414(a)(1)(B)]

Find a sample letter to request testing here: Learning Disabilities Association of America (page 2).
Send the letter to the school district office and your child’s principal. Make sure to have it sent by certified mail or have it date stamped and signed for when delivering it. If your child attends a private school, IDEA says to send the letter to the district’s special education director in the district of the private school (as opposed to the district where you live).

According to Dr. Larry Silver from LDA, if your child is homeschooled, meet with the principal of the school he or she would attend if in public school and request in writing that your child be tested for a possible learning disability.  The principal is required to have the school psychologist and possible other learning disability specialists review the request for testing.  It is possible they may do a screening test before the full test.  If the principal does not give the request to the school psychologist, you can file a complaint with the Board of Education.  More information can be found at Learning Disabilities Association of America and the Homeschool Legal Defense Association.

The school district must perform the evaluation within a timely matter.

2. Add a 60-day timeline to complete initial evaluation (unless the state has an established timeline).The initial evaluation:
Must be conducted within 60 days of receiving parental consent for the evaluation or, if the State establishes a timeframe within which the evaluation must be conducted, within that timeframe; and
• Must consist of procedures to determine if the child is a child with a disability under 34
CFR 300.8 and to determine the educational needs of the child.
[34 CFR 300.301(c)] [20 U.S.C. 1414(a)(1)(C)]

The 60 day timeline is a federal recommendation. Check with the state department of education under the Division of Special Education to find out the timeline for your state.

If your child is tested and the district says they do not qualify for special education services, you still have rights. Visit Learning Disabilities Association of America for more information.

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Related Posts:

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension?

Reading Test For My Child

Helping Your Child With Math

Communicating With Your Child’s Teacher

Parent Tips For Parent-Teacher Conferences

THFP Archive: Preparing Your Child For The First Day Of School

Preparing Your Child For The First Day Of School - Tips To Make The First Day A Success - From TeacherHelpForParents.com

Right now, teachers are prepping their classrooms for the first day of school. They are cleaning, organizing, and setting up their rooms. They are meeting with other teachers and specialists, making lesson plans, and mapping out the school year. They are doing all of this so that your children’s school year can be the most successful it can be. Parents can also help to create a successful school year for their children with these back to school tips.

1. When class lists are posted, look over the names to see which of your children’s friends are in their classes. Set up a playdate or get together with at least one of the other students before the school year begins. You can also include a classmate or two that your child does not know yet so that they can make a new friend. Just make sure the playdate doesn’t consist of three people. It’s too easy for two of the children to pair off leaving the third child alone. Getting together with classmates before the school year begins helps to alleviate some of the first day jitters. Your children can look for their friends when they get to school or even have a meeting place set up ahead of time. One of the most nervous times for children is walking in for that first moment on the first day of school. This plan will help to ease that nervousness.

2. Pack your children’s backpacks (or have your children pack them) the night before at the latest. This will ease first day stresses and will ensure nothing is forgotten. Lay out the first day of school outfits the night before. This saves any “crisis” the next morning of missing socks, shoes, etc. Go over anything your children may need to remember the night before as well as the next morning. Who is picking your children up from school, or what arrangements have been made for them after school? What time will your children need to be ready in the morning in order to arrive to school on time? Will your children be bringing or buying lunches? Reviewing these things the night before will help ease any anxiety of how the day will run for your children.

3. If you are going in with your children on the first day to meet the teacher, here are some things to help make it a successful experience. Teachers enjoy meeting parents, finding out about their new students, and learning of any special requirements a child may need. If you need to tell the teacher about a special requirement for your child (such as bladder needs, vision, hearing, etc), it’s a good idea to write it on a piece of paper or index card to hand to the teacher after you tell him or her. Include your child’s name, your name, and the need. This helps the teacher. There’s a lot happening on the first day, and this makes it easier for the teacher to help your child.

4. When you see your children for the first time after their first day of school, make it a special time if possible. Go out for a treat. Take a walk to the park. Anything you can think of to provide full attention to your children as they tell you all the details of their first day of school.

Here’s to a great school year!

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Related Posts:

Getting Involved In Your Child’s School

Communicating With Your Child’s Teacher

Getting Your Child Ready For Kindergarten

More Related Posts:
Free Lunch Box Notes
When Should My Child Start Kindergarten?
How To Use Twitter To Improve Your Child’s Education
(Includes Education Chat Times and Education Hashtags List)

Teaching Prepositions Through Writing and Play

Using Prepositions Through Movement and Writing - Great for Young Ages Too!

Inside Outside Upside Down by Stan and Jan Berenstain is a perfect book for reinforcing the concept of prepositions. In the book, a bear travels on a truck, outside, inside a box, and upside down on his way home. Explain to your child that a preposition is a word that describes the direction or position of a person or item (such as inside, outside, and upside down). Read the book with your child and point out the prepositions as you read. Help your child understand that if you changed the preposition, the bear would be in a completely different position.

After reading the book and discussing how prepositions define direction and position, have your child act out the book. Grab an empty box, reread the story, and have your child act out the preposition being used. Read it again, and this time, mix up the prepositions or add new ones, and have your child act out the new story. Your child could write his or her own directional story using prepositions and have you or a sibling act it out.

Using Prepositions Through Movement and Writing - Great for Young Ages Also!

Free Preposition Printable

If your child keeps a writing journal (which I highly recommend – see why here), have them choose an entry, change the prepositions, and create a silly story.

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More Resources:

 The Importance Of Adjectives: Using Specific Adjectives

The Importance of Writing Journals

Thanksgiving Poetry (Free Printables)

Writing: St. Patrick’s Day Limericks (Free Printable)

Spelling OI/Oy Words

Mother’s Day Poem Heart Card (Free Printable)

Father’s Day Writing Activity: My Dad News (Free Printable)

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

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Picture background by http://mycutegraphics.com.

FREE Common Core Teaching Resources

FREE Common Core Teaching Resources


FREE Common Core teaching resources for Pre-K through 12th Grade.

 Kindergarten Through 12th Grade Common Core Aligned Educational Videos

Open Ed Common Core Videos - The Largest Collection of Educational Videos Aligned To the Common Core Standards

Kindergarten Through 6th Grade Common Core Reading LessonsReadworks Breaks Down The Common Core Standards Into Grade Specific Lessons - Kindergarten Through 6th Grade
 2nd Through 9th Grade Common Core Computer Test Prep Practice
Click your grade on the top toolbar to begin.Common Core Computer Test Prep Practice - Grades 2nd - 9th
 Kindergarten Through Third Grade Common Core ELA Standards By Grade Level With Corresponding Lessons – From Read TennesseeKindergarten Through Third Grade Common Core ELA Standards By Grade Level With Corresponding Lessons - From Read Tennessee
 Pre-K Through 12th Grade Lessons From NCTM
Some lessons also include associated online activities.PreK-12th Grade Online Math Lessons
High School
Common Core Math Tools Lessons From NCTM Common Core Math Tools Lessons For High School
 High School Common Core Math Tools From NCTMCommon Core Math Tools For High School  CPMP Tools Software for Core-Plus MathmaticsCPMP Tools Software for Core-Plus Common Core Mathmatics
 High School Reasoning And Sense Making Task Library From NCTMReasoning and Sense Making Common Core Tasks For High School Kindergarten Through 8th Grade Van de Walle Blackline Masters For Math
From The Van de Walle Professional Mathematics SeriesVan de Walle FREE Blackline Masters Download
Preschool Through 9th Grade Mathmatics Blackline Masters For MathPreschool Through 9th Grade Mathmatics Blackline Masters Free Common Core Worksheets
These are good for basic review. You may want your children to write an explanation of how they arrived at their answers to help them prepare for the Common Core Assessment.  A math journal would be a great way to do this.Common Core Worksheets

All of these resources are free at the time of this posting.
If you find a resource that is no longer free, please message me or comment.

More Resources

Kindergarten Through 5th Grade ELA/Reading and Math Parent-Friendly Common Core Standards

Middle School and High School ELA/Reading Kid and Parent-Friendly Common Core Standards

Common Core Practice Test

Common Core Sample Test Questions

What is Common Core? (Parent-Friendly)

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Teacher Help For Parents is the answer to the parent question, “What can I do to help my child at home?”  Here are some of our popular posts:

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension?

Motivating Your Child To Read

Sight Words Your Child Needs To Know

Helping Your Child With Math

Preparing Your Child For The First Day Of School

Getting Your Child Ready For Kindergarten

How To Use Twitter To Improve Your Child’s Education

FREE 2013 Summer Reading Programs For Kids

Click Here To See Free 2015 Summer Reading Programs

Free Summer Reading Programs


Free 2013 Summer Reading Programs

School is out and summer fun has begun. It’s important to remember during these summer months to spend at least a little time in academics. Most students loose a bit of what was learned during the past year in the summer months. One way to help your child retain what was learned and be better prepared for the upcoming school year is to participate in a summer reading program. Some free summer reading programs are listed below.

City Libraries: Dig Into Reading Summer 2013 Reading Program – Read books and complete activities to receive free books, coloring stickers, and more. Most libraries are participating in this event.

Barnes and Noble – Your child can earn a free book when they read any eight books, record them on the provided reading journal, and bring it into Barnes and Noble.

Pottery Barn Summer Reading Challenge – Children 10 and under who complete one of Pottery Barn’s reading lists will receive a free book. Visit your local Pottery Barn Kids to pick up the reading list.

Chuck E. Cheese – Print off their reading calendar. Once your child reads for two weeks, they earn 10 free tokens. They also have other reward calendars such as homework, good behavior, and practicing a musical instrument. All of the calendars are for two weeks and are for 10 free tokens.

Showcase Cinemas Bookworm Wednesdays – From July 10th to August 7th, children can bring in a book report to the Bookworm Wednesdays 10:00 a.m. movie and watch it for free. Download the Book Report

TD Bank – Your child reads and records 10 books on the summer reading form, takes the form to TD Bank, and receives a $10 deposit into a new or existing Young Saver Account.

Pizza Hut’s Book It 2013 Summer Reading Challenge – This program is for kids in kindergarten through sixth grade. They have not launched their summer site yet, but I will update this post as soon as they do.

Find FREE Digital Books For Your Children

Did you know many libraries now offer digital collections of electronic and audio books for your computer, MP3 player, iPod, Smartphone, or tablet?*

You can find hundreds of free online children’s books by visiting your library’s website and clicking on TumbleBooks (TM). If you have a preschooler or beginning reader, be sure to visit DayByDayID.org every day this summer to read books and do fun activities.* Make sure you access TumbleBooks through your library’s site so you can read them for free.

See also:
How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension? (Free Reading Comprehension Printables)

Motivating Your Child To Read

Reading Baskets

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*From Dig Into Reading At Your Public Library This Summer Pamphlet

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Father’s Day Writing Activity: My Dad News

Father's Day Writing Activity-My Dad News


Writing can be used at all times of life including Father’s Day.  Why not have your children write about their dad for Father’s Day?  Use this “My Dad News” printable.  You can also create memorable handmade Father’s Day cards with ideas found here.  Have fun!

Father's Day Writing Activity - My Dad News Printable

My Dad News Printable

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Related Posts:
Father’s Day Card Ideas
Mother’s Day Poem Heart Card – Free Brainstorming Printable
Mother’s Day Card Ideas
Thanksgiving Poetry– Free Printables
St. Patrick’s Day Limericks – Free Printable
Free Summer Reading Programs For Kids

THFP Archive: Handmade Father’s Day Card Ideas

Here are some card ideas for dad’s special day.

Father's Day Card IdeaFather's Day Card Ideas

Shirt Pocket Cards Instructions

I like the idea of tucking a gift card into one of these shirt card ideas. The link above takes to you a site that describes how to make both shirts and includes templates.

Folded Shirt Card Instructions

Martha Stewart has this idea for a folded shirt card. Follow the link above to see step-by-step instructions for how to make this card.

Father's Day Writing Activity - My Dad News Printable

You can also made a Father’s Day newspaper with this free printable.

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Related Posts:
Father’s Day Writing Activity: My Dad News – Free Printable
Mother’s Day Poem Heart Card – Free Brainstorming Printable
Mother’s Day Card Ideas
Thanksgiving Poetry– Free Printables
St. Patrick’s Day Limericks – Free Printable