Category Archives: Writing

Mother’s Day Poems – FREE PRINTABLE

Mother's Day Tissue Paper Heart Poems With FREE PRINTABLE from TeacherHelpForParents.com

I like the idea of combining creative writing and art to make a Mother’s Day card.

To begin, use the brainstorming sheet below to come up with special attributes of your mother.

Mother's Day Poem Heart Card Brainstorming SheetPrintable Mother’s Day Poem Heart Card Brainstorming Sheet

Next, cross out the typed lines that were given on the paper as seen below. The words that you wrote become your poem.

Mother's Day Poem Heart Card Brainstorming Sheet 2

Click Here For A Larger View

Cut out a heart from your mother’s favorite color of construction paper. Use a ruler to draw lines across the middle of the heart. Write your poem on these lines.

Mother's Day Poem Heart Card 1

Cut your mother’s favorite color of tissue paper into squares. Wrap one square at a time around the end of a pencil, dip it into glue, and place it on your heart to create a border.

Mother's Day Poem Heart Card 2

After your tissue paper border is complete, allow the heart to dry.

Mother's Day Poem Heart Card 7

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Related Posts:
Mother’s Day Card Ideas
Father’s Day Card Ideas
Father’s Day Writing Activity: My Dad News – Free Printable
Thanksgiving Poetry -Free Printables
St. Patrick’s Day Limericks – Free Printable

Picture font by http://bythebutterfly.com.

 

Thanksgiving Poetry – Writing Sensory Poems For Kids (Free Printables)

Thanksgiving Poetry - Sensory Poems - FREE PRINTABLES

It’s Thanksgiving and the perfect time for your children to express their thankfulness creatively through poetry. One of my favorite forms of poetry for Thanksgiving is a sensory poem. Here’s how to write one:

1. Brainstorm what you see, hear, smell, taste, and feel at Thanksgiving. I’ve included a brainstorming sheet below that you can use.

Brainstorming Sheet Print-Save

2. Choose one thing from each category and write it on the appropriate line on the paper below. Also include a final line for “I know that.” It can be any summarizing sentence to conclude the poem.

Rough Draft Print – Save

3. Ready for poetry magic? Cross out the typed words and presto! – instant poetry. See example below. Capitalize the first word of the new phrase and cross out the period at the end.

4. Write your poem on a piece of construction or decorative paper. Include an illustration too.


Enlarged Final Draft Example

5. Share your poem with the world (or at least Grandma and Grandpa). There are many sites that will publish children’s poems for free. Two such sites are Kid Lit and Poetry Zone.

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Related Posts:

The Importance of Writing Journals

Teaching Prepositions Through Writing and Play (Free Printable)

The Importance of Adjectives: Using Specific Adjectives (Free Printable

Writing: St. Patrick’s Day Limericks (Free Printable)

Free Letter To Santa Printables – Plus Santa’s Address

Christmas Activities For Kids

 

The Importance Of Adjectives: Using Specific Adjectives

The Importance Of Adjectives - Using Specific Adjectives FREE PRINTABLE-


While reading Old Hat New Hat by Stan and Jan Berenstain, it occurred to me that this would be a great book for reinforcing adjectives. The book begins with a bear going into a hat store to find a new hat, but each hat is either too bumpy, too pointed, too big, too scratchy, etc. Explain to your child that adjectives describe nouns (in this case hats). Read the book with your child pointing out the adjectives as you read. Help your child understand that using specific adjectives when they write helps the reader to see in his or her mind what your child sees. If your child were to leave out the adjective or use one that’s not specific, the reader could see something completely different than what your child intended. Adjectives help to paint the picture in the reader’s mind.

After reading the book and discussing the importance of adjectives with your child, have your child come up with another object to describe. For example, they could describe a favorite teddy bear. Then have your child list adjectives that could describe the teddy bear. From the list, have your child choose three adjectives. Then have him or her draw three teddy bears using a different adjective with each bear. Show them that when they change the adjective, the picture changes as well. The same thing happens with the picture in the reader’s mind when you use adjectives.

The Importance Of Adjectives - Using Specific Adjectives FREE PRINTABLEFree Adjective Printable

If your child keeps a writing journal (which I highly recommend), have them choose an entry and add adjectives to his or her writing.

Extension: This book can also be used to reinforce the word “too” and its use.

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More Resources:

Teaching Prepositions Through Writing and Play (Free Printable)

The Importance of Writing Journals

Thanksgiving Poetry (Free Printables)

Writing: St. Patrick’s Day Limericks (Free Printable)

Spelling OI/Oy Words

Mother’s Day Poem Heart Card (Free Printable)

Father’s Day Writing Activity: My Dad News (Free Printable)

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

Picture font by http://bythebutterfly.com.
Picture background by http://mycutegraphics.com.

Teaching Prepositions Through Writing and Play

Using Prepositions Through Movement and Writing - Great for Young Ages Too!

Inside Outside Upside Down by Stan and Jan Berenstain is a perfect book for reinforcing the concept of prepositions. In the book, a bear travels on a truck, outside, inside a box, and upside down on his way home. Explain to your child that a preposition is a word that describes the direction or position of a person or item (such as inside, outside, and upside down). Read the book with your child and point out the prepositions as you read. Help your child understand that if you changed the preposition, the bear would be in a completely different position.

After reading the book and discussing how prepositions define direction and position, have your child act out the book. Grab an empty box, reread the story, and have your child act out the preposition being used. Read it again, and this time, mix up the prepositions or add new ones, and have your child act out the new story. Your child could write his or her own directional story using prepositions and have you or a sibling act it out.

Using Prepositions Through Movement and Writing - Great for Young Ages Also!

Free Preposition Printable

If your child keeps a writing journal (which I highly recommend – see why here), have them choose an entry, change the prepositions, and create a silly story.

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

More Resources:

 The Importance Of Adjectives: Using Specific Adjectives

The Importance of Writing Journals

Thanksgiving Poetry (Free Printables)

Writing: St. Patrick’s Day Limericks (Free Printable)

Spelling OI/Oy Words

Mother’s Day Poem Heart Card (Free Printable)

Father’s Day Writing Activity: My Dad News (Free Printable)

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

Picture font by http://bythebutterfly.com.
Picture background by http://mycutegraphics.com.

OI / OY Sight Word List

Oi Oy Sight Word List


Reading OI/OY Words

Around second or third grade, children learn about oi/oy words.  Below is a list of oi/oy words.  Begin by writing the words on index cards. Continue practicing with your child until he or she can say the words accurately. Mix the cards up each time to further help with reading practice.

Once your child can read the words on the index cards, print out this list of words. Start by reading the list to him or her. Then, have your child read with you. Finally, have your child read independently. The goal is for your child to be able to read this list in under one minute.  Have your child continue to practice until this goal is obtained.

oil

boy

enjoy

royal

foil

coil

royal

toy

loyal

boil

joy

choice

join

avoid

spoil

coin

point

noise

joint

moist

soy

rejoin

coy

ahoy

tinfoil

soil

broil

hoist

ballpoint

sirloin

viewpoint

Turquoise

Overjoyed – This is an example of the root word (joy) with a prefix (over) and a suffix (ed).

FREE PRINTABLE OI-OY Word List

Spelling OI/OY Words

Once your child can read oi/oy words with ease, transition into spelling oi/oy words. Make a T chart with “oi” on one side and “oy” on the other side. As your child finds oi/oy words in books, conversations, signs, or other places, have him or her write the words under the appropriate column. Your child will soon observe that most (but not all) words spelled with “oi” have the sound in the middle of the word, and most words spelled with “oy” have the sound at the end of the root word. Explain to him or her that if you add a suffix at the end of a word, it will look like the oi/oy sound is in the middle, but really it’s still at the end of the root word.

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Related Posts:   

All R-Controlled Printable Sight Words Lists Sight Words Your Child Needs To Know (Dolch Sight Words)
R-Controlled Sight Words – ER More Sight Words Your Child Needs To Know (Ekwall Sight Words)
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Long A Words How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?
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THFP Archive: Thanksgiving Poetry



It’s Thanksgiving and the perfect time for your children to express their thankfulness creatively through poetry.  One of my favorite forms of poetry for Thanksgiving is a sensory poem.  Here’s how to write one:

1.  Brainstorm what you see, hear, smell, taste, and feel at Thanksgiving.  I’ve included a brainstorming sheet below that you can use.

Brainstorming Sheet Print-Save

2.  Choose one thing from each category and write it on the appropriate line on the paper below.  Also include a final line for “I know that.”  It can be any summarizing sentence to conclude the poem.

Rough Draft Print – Save

3.  Ready for poetry magic?  Cross out the typed words and presto! – instant poetry.  See example below.  Capitalize the first word of the new phrase and cross out the period at the end.

4.  Write your poem on a piece of construction or decorative paper.  Include an illustration too.

Enlarged Final Draft Example

5.  Share your poem with the world (or at least Grandma and Grandpa).  There are many sites that will publish children’s poems for free.  Two such sites are Kid Lit and Poetry Zone.

Click here to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

The Importance of Writing Journals
Linking Literature to Writing: Understanding Prepositions
Linking Literature to Writing: The Importance of Adjectives

Writing: St. Patrick’s Day Limericks

Writing St. Patrick's Day Limericks With Free Printable

St. Patrick’s Day is a great time to write limericks.  Limericks will reinforce writing skills, syllables, and rhyming for your child.

Here is an example of a famous limerick by an anonymous author:
There was an old man from Peru,
Who dreamed he was eating his shoe.
He awoke in the night
With a terrible fright,
And found it was perfectly true.

Here is how to write a limerick:
Limericks are funny poems that contain five lines.  The rhyming pattern is AABBA.  The first, second, and fifth lines rhyme and have seven to ten syllables.  The third and fourth lines rhyme and have five to seven syllables.  An easy way to get started is to start with
“There once was a boy/girl named_________”
“Who_________________”

Write your limerick on the publishing paper below, decorate, and hang up in a special place.

Limerick Paper

Limerick Publishing Paper

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Related Posts:
St. Patrick’s Day Activity: Leprechaun Traps
The Importance of Writing Journals
Linking Literature to Writing: The Importance of Adjectives
Mother’s Day Poem Heart Card – Free Brainstorming Printable
Father’s Day Writing Activity: My Dad News – Free Printable

The Importance of Writing Journals

The Importance of Writing Journals

You have seen in previous posts that I praise the importance of writing journals.  Studies have shown that writing on a regular basis increases test scores, improves processing skills, helps children reason through explanation, and helps them understand story structure.  I highly recommend that your children have  writing journals no matter their ages.

What is a writing journal? 

A writing journal can be as simple as a spiral notebook.  A writing journal is a place where your children can explain in words the steps to complete a math problem, retell the events of their day, respond to a prompt (story starters), or write a story.  A writing journal is a starting off place.  It’s not a place for final drafts.  Children can choose stories or ideas that they have started in their journal, and perfect them at a later time into a final draft.

How are writing journals used?

I used writing journals in my classroom on a nearly daily basis.  Students were given a prompt and would write about it.  Later, when we were discussing a particular writing element (such as interesting beginnings, adding specific adjectives, etc.), I would have them choose a journal entry they had already written, and improve it based on the element we had just learned.

Can writing journals be used for reading?

Journals can also be used as reading response journals.  Children can write about what they read in books in their journals.  This is perfect when learning about specific story elements such as plot, theme, or setting.  Children can respond to what they have read while focusing on the specific element being taught.

Can writing journals be used for math?

Studies have shown that math scores improve when students can write to explain the process in solving a math problem.  This can be done at all grade levels.  Having to explain the process helps the children more fully understand the concept behind calculation.  Plus, some state tests require students to not only solve their math problems, but write to explain how they came to the answer.

Can I use a writing journal with my child who is too young to write?

It’s never too early to start writing.  Even if a child cannot write on his own yet, he can still can have a writing journal.  The child can draw a picture of a story in the notebook.  Then he can tell an adult a story to go with the picture.  The adult writes what the child says in the journal.  Over time, the adult can help guide the child into deeper stories and descriptions by asking questions such as, “How did she feel when her friend took her ballon?” or “What did his dog look like?”

Where can I find prompts for my children’s journals?

Prompts can be found in books and online.  I would also just come up with them on my own.  Scholastic has many writing prompt books.  You can also find prompts at creativewritingprompts.com.

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More Resources

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?Reading Fluency: Increasing Speed and Expression

 How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension? (Free Reading Comprehension Printables)

Motivating Your Child To Read

Linking Literature to Writing: Understanding Prepositions

Linking Literature to Writing: The Importance of Adjectives

Linking Literature to Writing: Understanding Prepositions

Using Prepositions Through Movement and Writing - Great for Young Ages Too!

Inside Outside Upside Down by Stan and Jan Berenstain is a perfect book for reinforcing the concept of prepositions.  In the book, a bear travels on a truck, outside, inside a box, and upside down on his way home.  Explain to your child that a preposition is a word that describes the direction or position of a person or item (such as inside, outside, and upside down).  Read the book with your child and point out the prepositions as you read.  Help your child understand that if you changed the preposition, the bear would be in a completely different position.

After reading the book and discussing how prepositions define direction and position, have your child act out the book.  Grab an empty box, reread the story, and have your child act out the preposition being used.  Read it again, and this time, mix up the prepositions or add new ones, and have your child act out the new story.  Your child could write his or her own directional story using prepositions and have you or a sibling act it out.

Using Prepositions Through Movement and Writing - Great for Young Ages Also!

Free Preposition Printable

If your child keeps a writing journal (which I highly recommend – see why here), have them choose an entry, change the prepositions, and create a silly story.

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

More Resources:
Linking Literature to Writing: The Importance of Adjectives

The Importance of Writing Journals

Thanksgiving Poetry (Free Printables)

Writing: St. Patrick’s Day Limericks (Free Printable)

Spelling OI/Oy Words

Mother’s Day Poem Heart Card (Free Printable)

Father’s Day Writing Activity: My Dad News (Free Printable)

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

Picture font by http://bythebutterfly.com.
Picture background by http://mycutegraphics.com.

Linking Literature to Writing: The Importance of Adjectives

The Importance Of Adjectives - Using Specific Adjectives FREE PRINTABLE-


While reading Old Hat New Hat by Stan and Jan Berenstain, it occurred to me that this would be a great book for reinforcing adjectives.  The book begins with a bear going into a hat store to find a new hat, but each hat is either too bumpy, too pointed, too big, too scratchy, etc.  Explain to your child that adjectives describe nouns (in this case hats).  Read the book with your child pointing out the adjectives as you read.  Help your child understand that using specific adjectives when they write helps the reader to see in his or her mind what your child sees.  If your child were to leave out the adjective or use one that’s not specific, the reader could see something completely different than what your child intended.  Adjectives help to paint the picture in the reader’s mind.

After reading the book and discussing the importance of adjectives with your child, have your child come up with another object to describe.  For example, they could describe a favorite teddy bear.  Then have your child list adjectives that could describe the teddy bear.  From the list, have your child choose three adjectives.  Then have him or her draw three teddy bears using a different adjective with each bear.  Show them that when they change the adjective, the picture changes as well.  The same thing happens with the picture in the reader’s mind when you use adjectives.

The Importance Of Adjectives - Using Specific Adjectives FREE PRINTABLEFree Adjective Printable

If your child keeps a writing journal (which I highly recommend), have them choose an entry and add adjectives to his or her writing.

Extension: This book can also be used to reinforce the word “too” and its use.

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

More Resources:

Teaching Prepositions Through Writing and Play (Free Printable)

The Importance of Writing Journals

Thanksgiving Poetry (Free Printables)

Writing: St. Patrick’s Day Limericks (Free Printable)

Spelling OI/Oy Words

Mother’s Day Poem Heart Card (Free Printable)

Father’s Day Writing Activity: My Dad News (Free Printable)

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

Picture font by http://bythebutterfly.com.
Picture background by http://mycutegraphics.com.