Category Archives: Reading

FREE PRINTABLE Short Vowel Word Lists

FREE Printable Short Vowel Word Lists - From TeacherHelpForParents.com

You can find all of my short vowel sound lists here in one easy place. The left column shares ideas for how to use the lists. The right column contains pdf files of the lists for easy printing and saving.

Ideas
For Use

Pdf
Files For Easy Saving And Printing

Short A Ideas Short A List
Short E Ideas Short E List
Short I Ideas Short I List
Short O Ideas Short O List
Short U Ideas Short U List

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Related Posts:

Long Vowel Sounds Word Lists
Long AWords
Long E Words
Long I Words
Long O Words
Long U Words

R-Controlled Word Lists
AR Words
ER Words
IR Words
OR Words
UR Words

Oi / Oy Sight Word List

High Frequency Sight Words and Phrases

Sight Words Your Child Needs To Know (Dolch Sight Words)

More Sight Words Your Child Needs To Know (Ekwall Sight Words)

Fry Phrases For Reading Fluency (Use After Sight Words)

More Reading Help

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

Reading Fluency: Increasing Speed and Expression

How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension? (Free Reading Comprehension Printables)

Motivating Your Child To Read

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THFP Archive: How Do I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension? (Free Comprehension Printables)

How Do I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension?  FREE COMPREHENSION PRINTABLES - From TeacherHelpForParents.com


Over the years, parents have asked me what they can do at home to help their children become better at reading comprehension. Here are four ideas you can do at home that can help your children do better in reading comprehension.

Background
It is important for children to be familiar with the topic they are reading. If they are reading fiction, an understanding of where or when the story takes place (especially if it is in the past or future), familiarity with the characters, and a general understanding of the topic will help them make sense of what they are reading. Just think if you were asked to read a book about a setting you knew nothing about, and characters that confused you, and they were all wound up together in a plot that was confusing to you. Would there be much comprehension and understanding happening as you read it? There would be very little. Now imagine if you understood these things first. You would have a much easier time understanding what you were reading. Every experience your children have – field trips, vacations, museums, meeting new people – help with building their background knowledge and eventually their reading comprehension.

Vocabulary
Knowing the vocabulary that is used in the book is closely tied to background knowledge. If you read a paragraph and don’t understand three or four of the words you just read – you’re out of luck! If your children do not understand what a word means, encourage them to show you so you can explain it to them. Or, if you rather, they can tried to figure out what the word means through context clues. This means they look at the sentences before or after, and then try to figure out what would make sense for the meaning of the word. Vocabulary can be increased starting in babyhood and going all the way through childhood by continually naming and explaining what your children see.

Make Connections (Text to Self, Text to Text, and Text to World)
Reading comprehension is not only recalling facts and details about what was read, but understanding what was read as well. One of my favorite reading comprehension books is Mosaic of Thoughtby Susan Zimmermann. In this book, the author defines three ways your children can make connections to what they are reading that will help them understand and remember what they are reading.

The first is text to self. The idea here is to help children relate the books they are reading to themselves. It could be something that happened in the books that also happened to them, or it could even be how the main character’s qualities remind them of themselves. For example, “Lucy was very honest when she told her mother she accidentally broke the lamp. That reminds me of the time I was honest when I told our neighbor I accidentally threw a ball threw their window.

The second is text to text. This means it’s important for your children to find similarities in the books they are reading to other books they have already read or heard. For example, “Junie B. Jones reminds me of Ramona Quimby because both of them are precocious and mean well, but usually end up getting themselves in a pickle”. Children will probably start off simple like there are kids and animals in both books, but help them move farther.

The third is text to world. The children find something that is happening in the book and relate it to what is happening (or has happened) in the world. For example, “Little House on the Prairie reminds me of what I learned about the pioneers on the Oregon trail.”

I use to make “Text To” journals for the students to write down the connections they were making while reading. These journals would be great for reading while at home as well. I’ve included a free text to journal printable that you can use. I would photocopy the paper, cut it in half, fold a piece of construction paper or the journal cover below over it, and then staple it together on top. You could also use a three ring binder and follow the same concept.

Text To Journal Cover

Text To Journal Cover

Text To Journal

Text to Journal Free Printable

I also have added big posters made from butcher paper in my classroom. I have one that says, “Text To Self,” another that says “Text To Text,” and a third that says, “Text To World.” As students would find connections in their reading, they would go to the appropriate posters and add the connections that they found along with their names.

Building these connections will help them personalize what they are reading and make it purposeful. Personalizing helps children understand what they are reading better and will help them to remember what they read as well.

Story Elements and Higher Order Questions

It is good to encourage your children to think broader and deeper while reading. Not only will this help them understand what they are reading, but it will also help to prepare them for state tests such as Common Core (now in the majority of states). I have included a free printable download below with questions for each part of the story elements. These questions are great because they can be used with just about any fiction book. Help your children to think beyond a question such as, “What color was the boy’s shirt?” and up to a question such as, “If you were in the same position as the boy, would you have done the same thing? Why or why not?” The questions I provided below provide higher order questions like these. There is one for preschool through first grade children and another for second grade through sixth grade children. They will help your children to start seeing reading as understanding what they are reading as opposed to just memorizing and recalling details of what they are reading. Understanding is key in reading comprehension.

Use this story elements questions free printable for second through sixth grade children. Story Elements Questions

 

Use this story elements questions free printable for preschool through first grade children. These questions can be used for many of the books your children read including simple picture books. Starting reading comprehension elements early will help your children as they grow older.

Story Element Questions For Preschool Through First Grade

 

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Related Posts:

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

Reading Test For My Child

How Do I Motivate My Child To Read?

Reading Fluency: Increasing Speed and Expression

Online Reading Games For Preschool Through Second Grade

OI / OY Sight Word List

Oi Oy Sight Word List


Reading OI/OY Words

Around second or third grade, children learn about oi/oy words.  Below is a list of oi/oy words.  Begin by writing the words on index cards. Continue practicing with your child until he or she can say the words accurately. Mix the cards up each time to further help with reading practice.

Once your child can read the words on the index cards, print out this list of words. Start by reading the list to him or her. Then, have your child read with you. Finally, have your child read independently. The goal is for your child to be able to read this list in under one minute.  Have your child continue to practice until this goal is obtained.

oil

boy

enjoy

royal

foil

coil

royal

toy

loyal

boil

joy

choice

join

avoid

spoil

coin

point

noise

joint

moist

soy

rejoin

coy

ahoy

tinfoil

soil

broil

hoist

ballpoint

sirloin

viewpoint

Turquoise

Overjoyed – This is an example of the root word (joy) with a prefix (over) and a suffix (ed).

FREE PRINTABLE OI-OY Word List

Spelling OI/OY Words

Once your child can read oi/oy words with ease, transition into spelling oi/oy words. Make a T chart with “oi” on one side and “oy” on the other side. As your child finds oi/oy words in books, conversations, signs, or other places, have him or her write the words under the appropriate column. Your child will soon observe that most (but not all) words spelled with “oi” have the sound in the middle of the word, and most words spelled with “oy” have the sound at the end of the root word. Explain to him or her that if you add a suffix at the end of a word, it will look like the oi/oy sound is in the middle, but really it’s still at the end of the root word.

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Related Posts:   

All R-Controlled Printable Sight Words Lists Sight Words Your Child Needs To Know (Dolch Sight Words)
R-Controlled Sight Words – ER More Sight Words Your Child Needs To Know (Ekwall Sight Words)
R-Controlled Sight Words – IR Fry Phrases For Reading Fluency (Use After Sight Words)
Long A Words How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?
Long E Words Reading Fluency: Increasing Speed and Expression
Long I Words How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension? (Free Reading Comprehension Printables)
Long U Words Motivating Your Child To Read
Short A Words Reading Test For My Child
Short Vowels Practice Word Lists Reading Baskets

Common Core: What Does My Child Need To Know? (Common Core Part 3)

Common Core - What Does My Child Need To Know


Common Core is the national education objectives that are currently in many states.  (See which ones here).  We have discussed What is Common Core? How will it affect my child?  and What can I do to prepare my child for Common Core?  We also have posted sample test questions for the new assessment.  In this part of our Common Core series, we are answering the question: What does my child need to know for Common Core?

Each grade level has certain things they need to know at that grade level in math and English Language Arts/Literacy.  The Common Core tests began in the 2014-2015 school year.  Below you will find parent-friendly versions of the English Language Arts/Literacy objectives for grades kindergarten – fifth grade.

I have updated this section of the post.

Parent-Friendly Standards From April Wulber.

*Want to know if your state is participating in Common Core?  Check out the end of the post: What is Common Core? to see if your state is listed.

To see the Common Core standards in their entirety, please visit corestandards.org.

More Resources

What Is Common Core? (parent-friendly)

Common Core Practice Test


Common Core Sample Test Questions


Parent-Friendly Middle School and High School Common Core Standards


Free Common Core Teaching Resources

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Related Posts:
What is Common Core? (Common Core Part 1)
Common Core Sample Test Questions (Common Core Part 2)
FREE Common Core Teaching Resources
Middle School And High School Kid Friendly Common Core Standards

Reading Assessment For My Child
Increasing Critical Thinking Skills Through Brain Teasers
Online Reading Games for Preschool Through Second Grade
How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?
High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Practice Online

Common Core Sample Test Questions (Common Core Part 2)

Common Core Sample Test Questions


I explained Common Core, how it will affect your child, and how to prepare your child in What is Common Core? (Common Core Part 1).  I have also explained what your child will need to know for the new Common Core assessment.  Here are some sample questions of what will be on the Common Core exam.  There are two different main tests.  Find your state below to see which test your child is taking.

Smarter Balanced Sample Test Questions

Smarter Balanced states include: Alabama, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Michigan*, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Sample test questions are from the Smarter Balanced assessment developers.

English Language Arts/ Literacy Sample Questions – View other sample questions at other grade levels by hovering at the very top of the screen (blue line) where it says, “View More English Language Arts/Literacy Sample Items.”

Mathmatics Sample Questions – View other sample questions at other grade levels by hovering at the very top of the screen (blue line) where it says, “View More Mathematics Sample Items.”

Smarter Balanced Sample Performance Tasks
Scroll down on the linked page to see all of the performance task.

3rd-5th Grade ELA/Literacy Performance Task 3rd-5th Grade Mathematics Performance Task
6th-8th Grade ELA/Literacy Performance Task 6th-8th Grade Mathematics Performance Task
High School Performance Task High School Performance Task

* The Common Core implementation has been halted in Michigan and is under review.

PARCC Sample Test Questions

**UPDATED**

PARCC states include: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia*, Illinois, Indiana*, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma*, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Tennessee.

Sample test questions are from the PARCC assessment developers.

MATH

ELA/LITERACY

3rd Grade Math 3rd Grade ELA/Literacy
Fractions on Number Line EBSR from End of Year Assessment
Fluency TECR from End of Year Assessment
The Field Prose Constructed Response from Narrative Writing Task
Vans for a Field Trip (NEW) 4th Grade ELA/Literacy
Sample Questions   Choose Elementary School Tasks in the left margin. Click on a 3rd grade link.   Then click “Part a” on the top of the page to see the first sample question. Passage 1 (NEW)
4th Grade Math Passage 2 (NEW)
Subtraction Fluency (NEW) Condensed Scoring Rubric for Prose Constructed Response Items (Draft)
Fraction Model (NEW) 5th Grade ELA/Literacy
Sample Questions   Choose Elementary School Tasks in the left margin. Click on a 4th grade link.   Then click “Part a” on the top of the page to see the first sample question. 5th Grade Passage (NEW)
5th Grade Math Condensed Scoring Rubric for Prose Constructed Response Items (Draft)
The Area of a Cut Board (NEW) 6th Grade ELA/Literacy
Mr. Edmund’s Pencil Box (NEW) Grade 6, Passage #1 (NEW)
6th Grade Math EBSR from Narrative Writing Task (Vocabulary)
Slide Ruler EBSR from Narrative Writing Task
Kelvin’s 100-Meter Dash (NEW) Prose Constructed Response from Narrative Writing Task
Sample Questions  Choose Middle School Tasks in the left margin. Click on a 6th grade link.  Then click “Part a” on the top of the page to see the first sample question. Condensed Scoring Rubric For Prose Constructed Response Items For 6th – 11th Grades (Draft)
7th Grade Math 7th Grade ELA/Literacy
Reading Three Books (NEW) Prose Constructed Response from Research Simulation Task (Summary)
Proportional Relationships (NEW) TECR from Research Simulation Task
Sample Questions   Choose Middle School Tasks in the left margin. Click on a 7th grade link.  Then click “Part a” on the top of the page to see the first sample question. Prose Constructed Response from Research Simulation Task (Analytical Essay)
8th Grade Math Condensed Scoring Rubric For Prose Constructed Response Items For 6th – 11th Grades (Draft)
Length of Segment AB 10th Grade ELA/Literacy
High School Math EBSR from Literary Analysis Task
High School Functions Vocabulary
Seeing Structure in a Quadratic Equation Prose Constructed Response—Sample #1
Seeing Structure in an Equation Prose Constructed Response—Sample #2
Sample Questions   Choose High School Tasks in the left margin. Choose an example question from the next page. Then click “Part a” on the top of the page to see the first sample question. Condensed Scoring Rubric For Prose Constructed Response Items For 6th – 11th Grades (Draft)
Algebra 1: Myla’s Swimming Pool (NEW)
Algebra II/Math III: Green Tea Observational Study (New!)
Algebra I/Math II: Michelle’s Conjectures (NEW)
Geometry/Math III: Geometric Construction Connection (NEW)
Algebra II/Math III: Temperature Changes (NEW)

(ELA means English Language Arts)

* Georgia and Oklahoma are still implementing the Common Core Standards but withdrew from the PARCC Assessment.

*The Indiana implementation is suspended by law and under public review.

Alaska and Texas are currently not members of the initiative. Nebraska and Virgina are members but have decided not to adopt the standards.  Minnesota has accepted the English/Language Arts standards but has rejected the math standards.

What is Common Core (parent-friendly)
Parent-Friendly Elementary Common Core Standards
Parent-Friendly Middle School and High School Common Core Standards
Free Common Core Teaching Resources
Common Core Practice Test

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Related Posts:
What is Common Core? (Common Core Part 1)
Common Core: What Does My Child Need To Know? (Common Core Part 3) (Parent-Friendly Standards)
Middle School and High School Kid Friendly Common Core Standards
FREE Common Core Teaching Resources
Common Core Practice Test

Reading Assessment For My Child
Increasing Critical Thinking Skills Through Brain Teasers
Online Reading Games for Preschool Through Second Grade
How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?
High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Practice Online

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What is Common Core? (Common Core Part 1)

What is Common Core? www.teacherhelpforparents.com #commoncore #ccss #ccchat


~Updated~

You may have heard the buzz lately about Common Core.  What is Common Core?  How will it affect your children?  What can you do to prepare your children to meet these standards?

What is Common Core?
Before these standards, each state would decide what students would learn at each grade level.  The Common Core initiative has given the states the same objectives for students to learn at each grade level.  States choose if they will join this initiative.  So far, 42 states* have joined.  States decide how these standards are taught.

How will Common Core Affect My Child?

A test has been created to measure if students have learned what they are expected to learn.  This test started in the 2014-2015 school year.  Each Common Core state has chosen to use either the PARCC RttT **Assessment Consortium test, the Smarter Balanced*** Consortium test, or have created their own test.   The test is given on the computer.  The Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium test also includes performance tasks.

These assessments are not your usual multiple choice standardized tests.  For example, you could have 5 possible answers to choose from and two of them could be correct.  The student will pick one of the correct answers and then type why they picked that answer.

See sample test questions.

What can you do to prepare your children to meet these standards?

One of the things states are teaching is keyboarding to help the students take the test.  It’s never too soon to start practicing keyboarding with your children at home.  This will help them focus more on their test taking and less on finding the right letters on the keyboard.

You will find parent-friendly Common Core standards here.  Take a look at these to see what your child needs to know.

You can also take a look at sample Common Core test questions to get an idea of how your children will be tested.

Your children’s teachers are continuing to receive training and instruction on how to  implement the Common Core Standards into their lesson plans.  They are also be preparing your children for the assessment through more writing and answer analysis.

Parent-Friendly Elementary Common Core Standards

Common Core Practice Test

Common Core Sample Test Questions

Parent-Friendly Middle School and High School Common Core Standards

Free Common Core Teaching Resources

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_________________________________________________________

Participation of States

*Alaska and Texas are not members of the initiative. Nebraska and Virgina are members but have decided not to adopt the standards.  Minnesota has accepted the English/Language Arts standards but has rejected the math standards.

 **PARCC states include: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia****, Illinois, Indiana****, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma****, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Tennessee.

***Smarter Balanced states include: Alabama, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

****Indiana withdrew from Common Core in March 2014.  Georgia and Oklahoma are still implementing the Common Core Standards but withdrew from the PARCC Assessment.

There are other states that have introduced legislation to repeal the standards.

Related Posts:
Common Core Sample Test Questions (Common Core Part 2)
Common Core: What Does My Child Need To Know? (Common Core Part 3) Kid Friendly Standards!
Middle School and High School Kid Friendly Standards
FREE Common Core Teaching Resources
Common Core Practice Test

Reading Assessment For My Child
Increasing Critical Thinking Skills Through Brain Teasers
Online Reading Games for Preschool Through Second Grade
How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?
High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Practice Online

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THFP Archive: How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader

One of the questions I have been asked the most as a teacher is, “How do I help my child become a better reader?” Successful readers do four things: sound out words, read fluently, comprehend what they are reading, and love to read.

Step One – Word Attack
It is important for your child to be able to recognize letters and sounds. Phonics and sight words are a large part of this step. I have posted phonetic sight word lists, Dolch sight word lists, and Ekwall sight word lists for your child to practice. Once your child knows the patterns and sight words, it’s time for him or her to move on to step two.

Step Two – Fluency
In this step, your child will put together the words and sounds they have learned to read passages. It’s best for them to start with phrases, such as Fry’s Phrases, and then move on to full passages.

Step Three – Comprehension
Once your child can read fluently at their grade level, it’s time for them to move on to comprehenison. I have a full artice about how to improve your child’s reading comprension here. It also includes free reading comprehension printables.

Step Four – Love of Reading
The final step is the most rewarding. Once your child can read stories at his or her grade level and understand what is being read, fostering a love of reading is a must. One way I have done this in my own classroom, is by reading from a series. Once children are comfortable with that series, they are more likely to read it on their own. Find ways to motivate your child to read and favorite reading series by age group here.

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Related Posts:
How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension (Free Reading Comprehension Printables)
How Do I Motivate My Child To Read?
Reading Fluency: Increasing Speed and Expression

How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension? (Free Comprehension Printables)

How Do I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension?  FREE COMPREHENSION PRINTABLES - From TeacherHelpForParents.com


Over the years, parents have asked me what they can do at home to help their children become better at reading comprehension.  Here are four ideas you can do at home that can help your children do better in reading comprehension.

Background
It is important for children to be familiar with the topic they are reading.  If they are reading fiction, an understanding of where or when the story takes place (especially if it is in the past or future), familiarity with the characters, and a general understanding of the topic will help them make sense of what they are reading.  Just think if you were asked to read a book about a setting you knew nothing about, and characters that confused you, and they were all wound up together in a plot that was confusing to you.  Would there be much comprehension and understanding happening as you read it?  There would be very little.  Now imagine if you understood these things first.  You would have a much easier time understanding what you were reading.  Every experience your children have – field trips, vacations, museums, meeting new people – help with building their background knowledge and eventually their reading comprehension.

Vocabulary
Knowing the vocabulary that is used in the book is closely tied to background knowledge.  If you read a paragraph and don’t understand three or four of the words you just read – you’re out of luck!  If your children do not understand what a word means, encourage them to show you so you can explain it to them.  Or, if you rather, they can tried to figure out what the word means through context clues.   This means they look at the sentences before or after, and then try to figure out what would make sense for the meaning of the word.  Vocabulary can be increased starting in babyhood and going all the way through childhood by continually naming and explaining what your children see.

Make Connections (Text to Self, Text to Text, and Text to World)
Reading comprehension is not only recalling facts and details about what was read, but understanding what was read as well.  One of my favorite reading comprehension books is Mosaic of Thoughtby Susan Zimmermann.  In this book, the author defines three ways your children can make connections to what they are reading that will help them understand and remember what they are reading.

The first is text to self.  The idea here is to help children relate the books they are reading to themselves.  It could be something that happened in the books that also happened to them, or it could even be how the main character’s qualities remind them of themselves.  For example, “Lucy was very honest when she told her mother she accidentally broke the lamp.  That reminds me of the time I was honest when I told our neighbor I accidentally threw a ball threw their window.

The second is text to text.  This means it’s important for your children to find similarities in the books they are reading to other books they have already read or heard.  For example, “Junie B. Jones reminds me of Ramona Quimby because both of them are precocious and mean well, but usually end up getting themselves in a pickle”.  Children will probably start off simple like there are kids and animals in both books, but help them move farther.

The third is text to world.  The children find something that is happening in the book and relate it to what is happening (or has happened) in the world.  For example, “Little House on the Prairie reminds me of what I learned about the pioneers on the Oregon trail.”

I use to make “Text To” journals for the students to write down the connections they were making while reading.  These journals would be great for reading while at home as well.  I’ve included a free text to journal printable that you can use.  I would photocopy the paper, cut it in half, fold a piece of construction paper or the journal cover below over it, and then staple it together on top.  You could also use a three ring binder and follow the same concept.

Text To Journal Cover

Text To Journal Cover

Text To Journal

Text to Journal Free Printable

I also have added big posters made from butcher paper in my classroom.  I have one that says, “Text To Self,” another that says “Text To Text,” and a third that says, “Text To World.”  As students would find connections in their reading, they would go to the appropriate posters and add the connections that they found along with their names.

Building these connections will help them personalize what they are reading and make it purposeful.  Personalizing helps children understand what they are reading better and will help them to remember what they read as well.

Story Elements and Higher Order Questions

It is good to encourage your children to think broader and deeper while reading.  Not only will this help them understand what they are reading, but it will also help to prepare them for state tests such as Common Core (now in the majority of states).  I have included a free printable download below with questions for each part of the story elements.  These questions are great because they can be used with just about any fiction book.  Help your children to think beyond a question such as, “What color was the boy’s shirt?” and up to a question such as, “If you were in the same position as the boy, would you have done the same thing?  Why or why not?”  The questions I provided below provide higher order questions like these.  There is one for preschool through first grade children and another for second grade through sixth grade children.  They will help your children to start seeing reading as understanding what they are reading as opposed to just memorizing and recalling details of what they are reading.  Understanding is key in reading comprehension.

Use this story elements questions free printable for second through sixth grade children. Story Elements Questions

 

Use this story elements questions free printable for preschool through first grade children.  These questions can be used for many of the books your children read including simple picture books.  Starting reading comprehension elements early will help your children as they grow older.

Story Element Questions For Preschool Through First Grade

 

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Related Posts:

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

Reading Test For My Child

How Do I Motivate My Child To Read?

Reading Fluency: Increasing Speed and Expression

Online Reading Games For Preschool Through Second Grade

R Controlled Sight Word Lists

R-Controlled Words


I have combined all of my r-controlled sight word lists below.  You will find them in an easy to print .pdf for your convenience.  Practice these sight words with your children after they have mastered the short and long vowel word lists.  This usually happens around second grade.

R Controlled Sight Words AR R Controlled Sight Words OR
R Controlled Sight Words ER R Controlled Sight Words UR
R Controlled Sight Words IR

 

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Related Posts:

Short Vowel Word Lists

Long A Word List

Long E Word List

Long I Word List

Long O Word List

Long U Word List

Oi/Oy Sight Word List

Fry Phrases for Reading Fluency


After your child has mastered the Dolch and Ekwall sight words, it is time for them to move on to Fry Phrases.  The phrases contain common words seen most while reading.  The first 300 Fry Phrases make up 67% of all words that children encounter when they read.  When your child is able to read these phrases with ease, you will see his or her reading fluency (how quickly and easily they can read) increase.

Here are six sets of Fry Phrases that you can print and use with your child.  Start with the first set.  Once your child can read the entire set easily, have him or her move on to the next set.  Continue until all of the sets are mastered

View or Print Fry Phrases
(6 Sets Total)

After your child has mastered all six sets of the Fry Phrases, he or she is ready to move on to reading comprehension.

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Related Posts:
Sight Words Your Child Needs To Know (Dolch Words)
More Sight Words Your Child Needs To Know (Ekwall Words)
How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension? (Free Comprehension Printables)
Reading Fluency: Increasing Speed And Expression
Reading Baskets
Reading Test For My Child
Motivating Your Child To Read
How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

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