Category Archives: Math

Fraction Sundaes: Teaching Fractions Through Art – FREE PRINTABLES




My students loved this activity. I found it in a teacher resource book years ago, but I don’t remember which book. It works well for reinforcing the fraction concept after it has been taught.

ice cream scoops templateIce Cream Scoops Template (pdf)

Ice Cream Bowl Template

Ice Cream Bowl Template (pdf)

Each student receives a paper with nine predrawn ice cream scoops and a bowl drawn on it (or they can draw their own). Students choose at least three but no more than seven different kinds of ice cream (they loved this part). Next, they color in the ice cream scoops to match the number chosen for each variety.

Example of Writing Fractions on the Bowl

 

After this, they write down the fraction that each type of ice cream represents on their bowl. For example, if they have three scoops of chocolate out of nine scoops, their fraction for chocolate scoops would be 3/9. Finally, they cut out their scoops and bowl and glue them on a piece of construction paper. Some students also enjoyed decorating their papers, adding cherries on top of their sundaes, etc.

Fraction Sundaes

You could also take it a step further by having an ice cream party using real ice cream. Students could request the amount of ice cream they want using fractions. For example, “May I please have chocolate be 1/3 of my sundae?

Extending this fraction concept at home, look for opportunities to use fractions in everyday life with your child. For example, while folding laundry, you could ask, “What fraction of the socks are white?” Your child could count the total number of socks to get the bottom number and then then number of white socks to get the top number. You could ask, “What fraction of your books are animal books?” Your child could count the total number of his or her books for the bottom number and the number of animal books for the top number. You can also turn the tables and have your child ask you a fraction question. For example, “What fraction of the dishes on our dinner table are plates?”

Fractions are everywhere in our world. As your child can see how this concept relates to everyday life, they will better understand it.

Teaching Fractions Through Art (pdf for printing and saving)

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Related Posts:
Helping Your Child With Math
Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 1) (Free Printables)
Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 2) Paper Airplane and Watermelon Seed Spitting Contests (Free Printables)
Increasing Critical Thinking Skills Through Brain Teasers
Extra Math Practice Online
High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Help Online

Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 2)

Fun With Math - Measurement - Paper Airplane and Watermelon Seed Spitting Contests


Measurement is fun to learn especially when it is taught in a hands-on way.  In Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 1), you saw how to introduce different measuring tools to your children.  Then, your children were able to explore the world with different measuring tools and units.

Now it’s time to have even more fun with these two activities: Paper Airplane Flying and Watermelon Seed Spitting Contest.

Paper Airplane Flying

Show your children examples of different types of paper airplanes.  You can find some examples here.  Discuss which paper airplane design will most likely fly the farthest.  What elements in that airplane do you think will help it fly the farthest?

Have your children make four different paper airplanes.  Give each airplane a name or number.  Mark out a starting line, and have your children throw the first airplane.  Next, have your children use a measuring tape to measure the distance the airplane has flown.  Record this measurement on the paper below.  Continue the same process with the other three airplanes.

After the four airplanes have been thrown, review the data received.  Which airplane went the farthest?  Is this the airplane that was predicted to go the farthest?  What do you think made it go the farthest?  Which airplane went the shortest distance?  Why do you think this airplane when the shortest distance?

Paper Airplane Measurement Paper

Fun With Math - Paper Airplane Measurement

Watermelon Seed Spitting Contest

Enjoy a sunny day with a watermelon seed spitting contest.  Cut slices of watermelon for your children.  Then, have them take turns seeing how far they can spit their seeds.  Analyze what makes the seeds go farther.  Does air flow, angle, or stance make seeds go farther?  Record your data on the paper below.

Watermelon Seed Spitting Contest Paper

Fun With Measurement - Paper Airplane and Watermelon Seed Spitting Contests

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Related Posts:
Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 1) (Free Printables)
Teaching Fractions Through Art (Free Printables)
Helping Your Child With Math
Increasing Critical Thinking Skills Through Brain Teasers

Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 1)

 

Fun With Math- Hands-On Measurement (Free Printables)


Measurement is fun to learn especially if it is learned in a hands-on way.

Introduce Measuring Units and Tools
To introduce measurement, show your children different types of measuring tools.  For example, show them rulers (pointing out both inches and centimeters), yard (or meter) sticks, and measuring tapes.  Point out the different units of measurement (inches, feet, yards) that can be used with each tool.  Then discuss when you might use the different units of measurements and tools.  For example, a measuring tape (sewing tape) can be used to measure something that is round.  Millimeters can be used to measure the length of the tip of a pencil.  Keep discussing until you can see that your children understand the different units of measurement and measuring tools.

Explore your world with different Measuring Units and Tools
Have your children find different objects in the room, house, classroom, or outside that they can measure.  Have them decide what measuring tool and unit they should use.  You can use the sheet below.  Have them explain why they chose what they did.   When children can thoroughly explain a concept and what they are doing, it shows that they truly understand and are learning.

Exploring Measurement

Exploring Measurement Free Printable

You can also choose to use one of the sheets below to get them started.  They can be done independently or with a partner.

 Fun With Measurement At School
This page can be used in the classroom.

 Fun With Measurement At Home
This page can be used for homeschoolers, as homework, or for parents who would like extra practice for their children.

 Fun With Measurement At School Free Printable Fun With Measurement At School  Fun With Measurement At Home Free Printable Fun With Measurement At Home

Find more hands-on measurement fun at Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 2) Paper Airplane and Watermelon Seed Spitting Contests (Free Printables)

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Related Posts:
Helping Your Child With Math
Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 2) Paper Airplane and Watermelon Seed Spitting Contests (Free Printables)
Teaching Fractions Through Art
Extra Math Practice Online
High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Help Online
Increasing Critical Thinking Skills Through Brain Teasers

Common Core: What Does My Child Need To Know? (Common Core Part 3)

Common Core - What Does My Child Need To Know


Common Core is the national education objectives that are currently in many states.  (See which ones here).  We have discussed What is Common Core? How will it affect my child?  and What can I do to prepare my child for Common Core?  We also have posted sample test questions for the new assessment.  In this part of our Common Core series, we are answering the question: What does my child need to know for Common Core?

Each grade level has certain things they need to know at that grade level in math and English Language Arts/Literacy.  The Common Core tests began in the 2014-2015 school year.  Below you will find parent-friendly versions of the English Language Arts/Literacy objectives for grades kindergarten – fifth grade.

I have updated this section of the post.

Parent-Friendly Standards From April Wulber.

*Want to know if your state is participating in Common Core?  Check out the end of the post: What is Common Core? to see if your state is listed.

To see the Common Core standards in their entirety, please visit corestandards.org.

More Resources

What Is Common Core? (parent-friendly)

Common Core Practice Test


Common Core Sample Test Questions


Parent-Friendly Middle School and High School Common Core Standards


Free Common Core Teaching Resources

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Related Posts:
What is Common Core? (Common Core Part 1)
Common Core Sample Test Questions (Common Core Part 2)
FREE Common Core Teaching Resources
Middle School And High School Kid Friendly Common Core Standards

Reading Assessment For My Child
Increasing Critical Thinking Skills Through Brain Teasers
Online Reading Games for Preschool Through Second Grade
How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?
High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Practice Online

THFP Archive: Helping Your Child With Math

Helping Your Child With Math www.teacherhelpforparents.com #parents #math

Have you ever wondered how to help your child with math?  Here are some ideas to get you started in addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and geometry.

Math can be very conceptual. Many of us say a math example instead of showing a math example to our children. The fact is children must see what is happening instead of just hearing what is happening. This is true with most areas of math. Here are some ideas to help your children see what they are learning.

Addition and Subtraction
Instead of saying, “Bob had four apples. He gave two away. How many does he have left?” Show it. Cheerios, blocks, cubes, or whatever you have can work. Have your children count out four Cheerios. Then have them physically move two Cheerios to the side. Now they can see that 4-2=2.

Instead of saying, “Laura had five bears. Lisa gave her three more bears. How many does she have in all?” Show it. Get out the Cheerios and show that 5+3=8. Or better yet, have your children gather five of their teddy bears. Then have them get three more. Now they can physically see what they are counting. Don’t move the objects for your children, have them do it. This is another way children learn – by doing.

Multiplication
Instead of saying, “There were five dogs. Each dog had four bones. How many bones are there altogether?” Show it. Have your child draw five dogs (they don’t have to be perfect). Then have them draw four bones under each dog. Now have them count up all of the bones. This helps to lay the foundation of multiplication and what it means.

Next, explain that multiplication is really repeat addition. Have them write the number four five times (4+4+4+4+4). Now have them add it. They will start to see the connection between multiplication and addition.

After that, have them draw five rows of four dots. Then have them count the dots. Children also learn multiplication through arrays.

Division
The key to understanding the concept of division is to understand that it is sharing equally. This can be done through “divvying up.” I often start division by using Skittles or playing cards. I give groups of children a set amount of cards. Then I tell them to pass out the cards like they do when they are playing a game. The dealer passes out one card to each person until all of the cards are dealt. Then, they count up how many cards each person has in his or her hand. I purposefully start with an even amount. After this, I give them enough playing cards where there won’t be an equal amount. I explain to them that no one gets these cards because that wouldn’t be fair. Division is fair. Everyone gets the same amount. I explain that these “leftover cards” are called a remainder. This can also be done with Skittles. Children definately understand the concept of fairness when it comes to candy. After this, we move on to story problems.

Instead of saying, “Anna had 30 lollipops. She gave the same number to each of her five friends. How many lollipops did each friend receive?” Show it. Have your children draw five people (stick people are fine). Then have them “divvy up” the suckers. Starting with the first person, put one sucker under each person (one at a time) until all of the 30 lollipops are gone. Then have them count up how many lollipops each friend received.

Geometry
It is important to lay a foundation of geometry in children when they are young so that it is easier for them as they get older. Start out by showing them different shapes. Younger children could work with triangles and rectangles, and older children could work with triangular pyramids and rectangular prisms. Show them different examples of color and size. Also, turn and flip the figure so they can see it from different angles. Once they recognize the shapes, make it meaningful to them.

To make geometry meaningful, have them find the shapes they have learned in real life. For example, a Kleenex box is a rectangular prism. Let them go on a scavenger hunt finding as many “real life” shapes as they can. This can also be done as an activity on a trip. “I spy something that is a sphere.”

Here is also a post on how to teach fractions through art: Teaching Fractions Through Art.

Here are some sites that provide online math practice for your child: Online Math Practice.

More Math Help:
Teaching Fractions Through Art (Free Printables)
Extra Math Practice Online
High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Help Online
Free ebook: Fun Math For Young Learners
Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 1) (Free Printables)
Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 2) Paper Airplane and Watermelon Seed Spitting Contests (Free Printables)

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Common Core Sample Test Questions (Common Core Part 2)

Common Core Sample Test Questions


I explained Common Core, how it will affect your child, and how to prepare your child in What is Common Core? (Common Core Part 1).  I have also explained what your child will need to know for the new Common Core assessment.  Here are some sample questions of what will be on the Common Core exam.  There are two different main tests.  Find your state below to see which test your child is taking.

Smarter Balanced Sample Test Questions

Smarter Balanced states include: Alabama, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Michigan*, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Sample test questions are from the Smarter Balanced assessment developers.

English Language Arts/ Literacy Sample Questions – View other sample questions at other grade levels by hovering at the very top of the screen (blue line) where it says, “View More English Language Arts/Literacy Sample Items.”

Mathmatics Sample Questions – View other sample questions at other grade levels by hovering at the very top of the screen (blue line) where it says, “View More Mathematics Sample Items.”

Smarter Balanced Sample Performance Tasks
Scroll down on the linked page to see all of the performance task.

3rd-5th Grade ELA/Literacy Performance Task 3rd-5th Grade Mathematics Performance Task
6th-8th Grade ELA/Literacy Performance Task 6th-8th Grade Mathematics Performance Task
High School Performance Task High School Performance Task

* The Common Core implementation has been halted in Michigan and is under review.

PARCC Sample Test Questions

**UPDATED**

PARCC states include: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia*, Illinois, Indiana*, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma*, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Tennessee.

Sample test questions are from the PARCC assessment developers.

MATH

ELA/LITERACY

3rd Grade Math 3rd Grade ELA/Literacy
Fractions on Number Line EBSR from End of Year Assessment
Fluency TECR from End of Year Assessment
The Field Prose Constructed Response from Narrative Writing Task
Vans for a Field Trip (NEW) 4th Grade ELA/Literacy
Sample Questions   Choose Elementary School Tasks in the left margin. Click on a 3rd grade link.   Then click “Part a” on the top of the page to see the first sample question. Passage 1 (NEW)
4th Grade Math Passage 2 (NEW)
Subtraction Fluency (NEW) Condensed Scoring Rubric for Prose Constructed Response Items (Draft)
Fraction Model (NEW) 5th Grade ELA/Literacy
Sample Questions   Choose Elementary School Tasks in the left margin. Click on a 4th grade link.   Then click “Part a” on the top of the page to see the first sample question. 5th Grade Passage (NEW)
5th Grade Math Condensed Scoring Rubric for Prose Constructed Response Items (Draft)
The Area of a Cut Board (NEW) 6th Grade ELA/Literacy
Mr. Edmund’s Pencil Box (NEW) Grade 6, Passage #1 (NEW)
6th Grade Math EBSR from Narrative Writing Task (Vocabulary)
Slide Ruler EBSR from Narrative Writing Task
Kelvin’s 100-Meter Dash (NEW) Prose Constructed Response from Narrative Writing Task
Sample Questions  Choose Middle School Tasks in the left margin. Click on a 6th grade link.  Then click “Part a” on the top of the page to see the first sample question. Condensed Scoring Rubric For Prose Constructed Response Items For 6th – 11th Grades (Draft)
7th Grade Math 7th Grade ELA/Literacy
Reading Three Books (NEW) Prose Constructed Response from Research Simulation Task (Summary)
Proportional Relationships (NEW) TECR from Research Simulation Task
Sample Questions   Choose Middle School Tasks in the left margin. Click on a 7th grade link.  Then click “Part a” on the top of the page to see the first sample question. Prose Constructed Response from Research Simulation Task (Analytical Essay)
8th Grade Math Condensed Scoring Rubric For Prose Constructed Response Items For 6th – 11th Grades (Draft)
Length of Segment AB 10th Grade ELA/Literacy
High School Math EBSR from Literary Analysis Task
High School Functions Vocabulary
Seeing Structure in a Quadratic Equation Prose Constructed Response—Sample #1
Seeing Structure in an Equation Prose Constructed Response—Sample #2
Sample Questions   Choose High School Tasks in the left margin. Choose an example question from the next page. Then click “Part a” on the top of the page to see the first sample question. Condensed Scoring Rubric For Prose Constructed Response Items For 6th – 11th Grades (Draft)
Algebra 1: Myla’s Swimming Pool (NEW)
Algebra II/Math III: Green Tea Observational Study (New!)
Algebra I/Math II: Michelle’s Conjectures (NEW)
Geometry/Math III: Geometric Construction Connection (NEW)
Algebra II/Math III: Temperature Changes (NEW)

(ELA means English Language Arts)

* Georgia and Oklahoma are still implementing the Common Core Standards but withdrew from the PARCC Assessment.

*The Indiana implementation is suspended by law and under public review.

Alaska and Texas are currently not members of the initiative. Nebraska and Virgina are members but have decided not to adopt the standards.  Minnesota has accepted the English/Language Arts standards but has rejected the math standards.

What is Common Core (parent-friendly)
Parent-Friendly Elementary Common Core Standards
Parent-Friendly Middle School and High School Common Core Standards
Free Common Core Teaching Resources
Common Core Practice Test

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Related Posts:
What is Common Core? (Common Core Part 1)
Common Core: What Does My Child Need To Know? (Common Core Part 3) (Parent-Friendly Standards)
Middle School and High School Kid Friendly Common Core Standards
FREE Common Core Teaching Resources
Common Core Practice Test

Reading Assessment For My Child
Increasing Critical Thinking Skills Through Brain Teasers
Online Reading Games for Preschool Through Second Grade
How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?
High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Practice Online

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What is Common Core? (Common Core Part 1)

What is Common Core? www.teacherhelpforparents.com #commoncore #ccss #ccchat


~Updated~

You may have heard the buzz lately about Common Core.  What is Common Core?  How will it affect your children?  What can you do to prepare your children to meet these standards?

What is Common Core?
Before these standards, each state would decide what students would learn at each grade level.  The Common Core initiative has given the states the same objectives for students to learn at each grade level.  States choose if they will join this initiative.  So far, 42 states* have joined.  States decide how these standards are taught.

How will Common Core Affect My Child?

A test has been created to measure if students have learned what they are expected to learn.  This test started in the 2014-2015 school year.  Each Common Core state has chosen to use either the PARCC RttT **Assessment Consortium test, the Smarter Balanced*** Consortium test, or have created their own test.   The test is given on the computer.  The Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium test also includes performance tasks.

These assessments are not your usual multiple choice standardized tests.  For example, you could have 5 possible answers to choose from and two of them could be correct.  The student will pick one of the correct answers and then type why they picked that answer.

See sample test questions.

What can you do to prepare your children to meet these standards?

One of the things states are teaching is keyboarding to help the students take the test.  It’s never too soon to start practicing keyboarding with your children at home.  This will help them focus more on their test taking and less on finding the right letters on the keyboard.

You will find parent-friendly Common Core standards here.  Take a look at these to see what your child needs to know.

You can also take a look at sample Common Core test questions to get an idea of how your children will be tested.

Your children’s teachers are continuing to receive training and instruction on how to  implement the Common Core Standards into their lesson plans.  They are also be preparing your children for the assessment through more writing and answer analysis.

Parent-Friendly Elementary Common Core Standards

Common Core Practice Test

Common Core Sample Test Questions

Parent-Friendly Middle School and High School Common Core Standards

Free Common Core Teaching Resources

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_________________________________________________________

Participation of States

*Alaska and Texas are not members of the initiative. Nebraska and Virgina are members but have decided not to adopt the standards.  Minnesota has accepted the English/Language Arts standards but has rejected the math standards.

 **PARCC states include: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia****, Illinois, Indiana****, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma****, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Tennessee.

***Smarter Balanced states include: Alabama, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

****Indiana withdrew from Common Core in March 2014.  Georgia and Oklahoma are still implementing the Common Core Standards but withdrew from the PARCC Assessment.

There are other states that have introduced legislation to repeal the standards.

Related Posts:
Common Core Sample Test Questions (Common Core Part 2)
Common Core: What Does My Child Need To Know? (Common Core Part 3) Kid Friendly Standards!
Middle School and High School Kid Friendly Standards
FREE Common Core Teaching Resources
Common Core Practice Test

Reading Assessment For My Child
Increasing Critical Thinking Skills Through Brain Teasers
Online Reading Games for Preschool Through Second Grade
How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?
High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Practice Online

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Helping Your Child With Math

Helping Your Child With Math www.teacherhelpforparents.com #parents #math

 

Math can be very conceptual. Many of us say a math example instead of showing a math example to our children. The fact is children must see what is happening instead of just hearing what is happening. This is true with most areas of math. Here are some ideas to help your children see what they are learning.

Addition and Subtraction
Instead of saying, “Bob had four apples. He gave two away. How many does he have left?” Show it. Cheerios, blocks, cubes, or whatever you have can work. Have your children count out four Cheerios. Then have them physically move two Cheerios to the side. Now they can see that 4-2=2.

Instead of saying, “Laura had five bears. Lisa gave her three more bears. How many does she have in all?” Show it. Get out the Cheerios and show that 5+3=8. Or better yet, have your children gather five of their teddy bears. Then have them get three more. Now they can physically see what they are counting. Don’t move the objects for your children, have them do it. This is another way children learn – by doing.

Multiplication
Instead of saying, “There were five dogs. Each dog had four bones. How many bones are there altogether?” Show it. Have your child draw five dogs (they don’t have to be perfect). Then have them draw four bones under each dog. Now have them count up all of the bones. This helps to lay the foundation of multiplication and what it means.

Next, explain that multiplication is really repeat addition. Have them write the number four five times (4+4+4+4+4). Now have them add it. They will start to see the connection between multiplication and addition.

After that, have them draw five rows of four dots. Then have them count the dots. Children also learn multiplication through arrays.

Division
The key to understanding the concept of division is to understand that it is sharing equally. This can be done through “divvying up.”  I often start division by using Skittles or playing cards. I give groups of children a set amount of cards. Then I tell them to pass out the cards like they do when they are playing a game. The dealer passes out one card to each person until all of the cards are dealt. Then, they count up how many cards each person has in his or her hand. I purposefully start with an even amount. After this, I give them enough playing cards where there won’t be an equal amount. I explain to them that no one gets these cards because that wouldn’t be fair. Division is fair. Everyone gets the same amount. I explain that these “leftover cards” are called a remainder. This can also be done with Skittles. Children definately understand the concept of fairness when it comes to candy. After this, we move on to story problems.

Instead of saying, “Anna had 30 lollipops. She gave the same number to each of her five friends. How many lollipops did each friend receive?” Show it. Have your children draw five people (stick people are fine). Then have them “divvy up” the suckers. Starting with the first person, put one sucker under each person (one at a time) until all of the 30 lollipops are gone. Then have them count up how many lollipops each friend received.

Geometry
It is important to lay a foundation of geometry in children when they are young so that it is easier for them as they get older.  Start out by showing them different shapes. Younger children could work with triangles and rectangles, and older children could work with triangular pyramids and rectangular prisms. Show them different examples of color and size. Also, turn and flip the figure so they can see it from different angles. Once they recognize the shapes, make it meaningful to them.

To make geometry meaningful, have them find the shapes they have learned in real life. For example, a Kleenex box is a rectangular prism. Let them go on a scavenger hunt finding as many “real life” shapes as they can. This can also be done as an activity on a trip. “I spy something that is a sphere.”

Here is also a post on how to teach fractions through art: Teaching Fractions Through Art.

If your child needs more practice with measurement, check out: Fun With Math: Hands-on Measurement (Part 1) and Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 2) Paper Airplane and Watermelon Seed Spitting Contests.

Here are some sites that provide online math practice for your child: Online Math Practice.

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

More Math Help:

Teaching Fractions Through Art (Free Printables)

Fun With Math: Hands-on Measurement (Part 1) (Free Printables)

Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 2) Paper Airplane and Watermelon Seed Spitting Contests (Free Printables)

Extra Math Practice Online

High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Help Online

How To Learn With Placemats: Using Placemats For No Pressure Learning

Free ebook: Fun Math For Young Learners

How To Request A Learning Disability Test For Your Child

High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Help Online

High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Help Online

If your child has a sibling in middle school or high school, this is a valuable site for them. It’s a free site with over 3,000 videos teaching subjects in math, science, humanities, test prep, and more. I have heard stories of great results from students who have watched these videos. They say he makes the subjects easy to understand and their grades have risen because of them. You can find the videos at http://www.khanacademy.org/

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Related Posts:
Helping Your Child With Math
Teaching Fractions Through Art (Free Printables)
Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 1) (Free Printables)
Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 2) Paper Airplane and Watermelon Seed Spitting Contests (Free Printables)
Extra Math Practice Online
Increasing Critical Thinking Skills Through Brain Teasers

Increasing Critical Thinking Skills Through Brain Teasers

Increasing Critical Thinking Skills Through Brain Teasers


Brain teasers help to increase your child’s critical thinking skills which can be a benefit across curriculum areas.  Plus, these games can be a lot of fun.  Here are some brain teasers for your child to try.  They are best suited for 4th – 6th graders, but other ages can give them a try as well.

Word Puzzle – Soccer
Figure out the mystery word that matches each clue.

Hink Pinks
A hink pink is a pair of rhyming words that can be used to define a silly clue.

Thinking Riddles
Figure out the answers to these tricky riddle puzzles.

Rebus Puzzles
Can you tell what these picture puzzles are trying to say?

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Related Posts:
Helping Your Child With Math
Teaching Fractions Through Art (Free Printables)
Fun With Math: Hands-On Measurement (Part 1) (Free Printables)
Extra Math Practice Online
High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Help Online