Category Archives: General School Topics

Preparing Your Child For Kindergarten

Getting Your Child Ready For Kindergarten - From TeacherHelpForParents.com


Guest Post By Tami Phay

Fall is fast approaching and it is that time of year again . . . school is about to start! This time, it’s extra special for you as you prepare for your “baby” to head off to kindergarten! Every parent wonders if their child is prepared for life as a kindergartner, but how do you really know if they are? As a kindergarten teacher, I can offer some helpful tips on getting your child ready to launch into the world of learning. Many parents focus on the academics often forgetting the social and fine motor aspects of school. Of course it is great if your child comes into kindergarten knowing every letter and sound, can count to 100, and knows all their colors, but do they need to? Well if they did, I would be out of a job. Helping your child learn some of their letters, sounds, numbers, and colors is a great start, but as I mentioned before there is more to kindergarten then just the academics. Here are a few tips to help ensure your child is completely ready for kindergarten:

  • Make sure your child can put on and zip their coat. When winter arrives and the kids are scrambling to get out to recess and the teacher cannot put on and zip 24 coats!
  • Put your child in pants that they can zip and unzip themselves. I can’t tell you how many students come out of the bathroom with their pants half on because they can’t zip, button, or buckle themselves.
  • If your child is still learning to tie their shoes then make life easier for them and get them shoes with Velcro. When your child’s shoe comes untied, it not only becomes a safety issue but remember that it might only take you one minute to tie your child’s shoe but multiply that by 24 students…and the teacher could easily spend the whole day retying shoes.
  • Have a plan for how your child will normally get home from school and go over it with your child several times. If your child rides the bus, put a tag on their backpack with their bus number and what street they get off on. Unfortunately, I have seen kindergartners get off on the wrong stop and panic sets in! Little kiddos also get very anxious when they are not sure they know the plan for how they are getting home.
  • If your child will be eating lunch at school, don’t over pack a lunch! Parents will often give their child way too many options in their lunch box thinking their child can just pick and chose what they want to eat, but many kids get worried about what to eat and if they can finish it all during lunch time. Make it simple.
  • Talk to your child once they start school. Encourage them to talk about their new friends, what they are learning, and what they are doing. This helps you to get a glimpse into their school life and get a feel for anything that might concern you that you want to discuss with the teacher.

Enjoy this new chapter of your life and happy learning!

Tami is currently a kindergarten teacher. She has also been a first and fourth grade teacher.

Related Posts:

Preparing Your Child For The First Day Of School

When Should My Child Start Kindergarten?

Communicating With Your Child’s Teacher

Getting Involved In Your Child’s School

Parent Tips For Parent-Teacher Conferences

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Improving Your Children’s Relationship With Their Teacher (FREE Personality Assessment For Your Child)

Improving Your Children's Relationship With Their Teacher - FREE Personality Assessment For Your Child - From TeacherHelpForParents.com

Does your child have a teacher that he feels doesn’t quite understand him?  Does your child have a hard time adjusting to how the teacher interacts with her?  There is hope.  The reason may be a difference in personalities and understanding how to interact with those personalities.

There are many different types of personality assessments that you can find online.  One of these was developed by Gary Smalley.  He divides personalities into four types: lion, otter, golden retriever, and beaver.

The Lion Personality

Lions are people who like to take charge and are competitive.  Their communication style is blunt and direct.  They enjoy recognition and problem solving.

The Otter Personality

Otters are people who are optimistic and motivating.  Their communication style is encouraging and motivating.  They enjoy approval and social recognition.

The Golden Retriever Personality

Golden Retrievers are people who are peace-makers and sensitive.  Their communication style is indirect and they are great listeners.  They enjoy emotional security and an agreeable environment.

The Beaver Personality

Beavers are people who are accurate, precise, and analytical.  Their communication style is factual and they are great listeners concerning tasks.  They enjoy quality and exact expectations.

Looking at the descriptions above, you may be able to guess which personality type is your child and which personality type is your child’s teacher.  To find out for sure, here is a free simple personality assessment for your child from Gary Smalley: Smalley Institute Personality Assessment.

After reviewing the assessment, look at the matrix that comes after the assessment that will further describe the personalities.  You will find useful information about what your child needs.  You can also explain to your child the personality type that you think may belong to his teacher.  Show your child how his teacher sees the world and how it may come across to him.  It can make for a great teachable moment of understanding how people are different in how they think and relate.

Here is a great resource that you can find on Amazon, other retailers, or maybe even your public library.  It is a kid-friendly book that explains the four personalities in a way that is simple for children to understand: The Treasure Tree: Helping Kids Understand Their Personality.


Click the picture above to be taken to Amazon.com to view this book.
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Related Posts:

Parent Tips For Parent-Teacher Conferences

10 Thoughtful Teacher Appreciation Gifts

How To Use Twitter To Improve Your Child’s Education

Communicating With Your Child’s Teacher

Preparing Your Child For The First Day Of School

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How To Learn With Placemats: Using Placemats For No Pressure Learning

Using Placemats For No Pressure Learning - Great For All Ages - From TeacherHelpForParents.com

Mealtime is an opportune time for no pressure learning.  This can be done simply with the use of strategically picked placemats.  Awhile back, I saw a young boy on a talk show who had memorized all of the presidents, the order they were president, and an interesting fact about each one.  When the parents were asked how this young boy could know all of this information, their answer was simple: a placemat.  They had found an inexpensive placemat with presidents on it for their son.  They were surprised when, at meal time, he would ask questions about each president.  The parents would answer his questions, and his learning grew.

I thought to myself, what a great idea!  Kids are sitting at the table eating and conversing.  Why not try an alphabet, number, or geography placemat as conversation starters?  I’ve heard of kids not only asking for the names of the letters on an alphabet placemat, but the sound the letter makes and a word that starts with that letter as well.  It then turns into a game with the kids as they want their parents to ask them questions such as: “What letter makes the ‘ssssss’ sound?” or “What letter does cow start with?”  It adds to mealtime conversation with the whole family, and is no pressure learning guided by the children’s questions about what they want to know.

Give it a try.  You’ll be surprised how much your children learn all while having fun.

You can find placemats many places such as the grocery store, dollar store, or online.  I really like the Melissa and Doug placemats that can be found on Amazon or other stores.

Here are some examples:

       

According to the reviews, people really like these placemats.  They do; however, caution about not using the crayons on them.
These placemats are my affiliate links.

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Related Posts:

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

How Do I Motivate My Child To Read?

Reading Fluency: Increasing Speed and Expression

How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension? (Free Reading Comprehension Printables)

How To Use Reading Baskets At Home

Helping Your Child With Math

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Parent Tips For Parent – Teacher Conferences

Parent Tips For Parent - Teacher Conferences by TeacherHelpForParents

It’s parent-teacher conference time again, and here are 6 tips to get the most out of your individual time with your child’s teacher:

1.  Schedule early – If you have a choice of when to schedule your child’s conference, ask for a time early in the day.  This is the time teachers are at their best.  With 25 – 30 individual conferences (or more), a teacher can be worn out mentally toward the end of the day.

2.  This is your time to address concerns – Determine in advance if there are concerns that you would like to address with your child’s teacher.  These concerns can be anything from friends, to homework, to academics.  This moment is set aside for you to have individual time with your child’s teacher to talk about your concerns.  If you believe your child may have a learning disability and would like to speed up the testing process, check out my post How To Request A Learning Disability Test For Your Child.

3Determine if you will need longer than the allotted conference time – If you have some concerns that you would like to address with your child’s teacher that may take the bulk of the conference time, ask if you can schedule a longer conference time.  You can also ask to schedule a longer time on a different day.  This will help to insure that your concerns receive the attention and time that they need.

4.  Ask if children can attend conferences – If you will need (or want) to bring your children (or siblings) to the conference, ask in advance what the policy is for this.  Usually you will find that your children (and siblings) are welcome.  Often, teachers will set up an area in their classrooms or the hallway with crayons, paper, and books to entertain the children while you meet.  Some teachers will even invite your children to be involved in the conference if what is being discussed isn’t sensitive in nature.

5. Conferences are also a time to meet with your child’s specialists – If your child’s school has specialist teachers such as music, physical education, technology, and art, you can meet with them during this time as well.  Often, these conferences are just “pop in” conferences.  Usually, you can just stop by their classrooms for a few minutes to say “hi” and receive a little feedback on how your child is performing.  Other specialists such as speech, special education, Title 1, and advanced learning are usually present at your child’s conference with the teacher.

6.  The biggest tip (and secret) of all is teachers are just as nervous as the parents – While I’m sure there are exceptions to this secret, the fact is, most teachers are anxious during conference time.  Teachers care so much about your children and are hoping that the conferences are a success.

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Related Posts:

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension?

Reading Test For My Child

Helping Your Child With Math

Communicating With Your Child’s Teacher

How To Request A Learning Disability Test For Your Child

For Teachers: How To Have A Success Parent-Teacher Conference (FREE Conference Planning Printable)

How To Have A Successful Parent – Teacher Conference (Free Conference Planning Printable)

How To Have A Successful Parent - Teacher Conference (Free Conference Planning Printable) From TeacherHelpForParents.com

 

Teachers, are you wondering how to make your parent-teacher conferences a success?  Here are some helpful tips and a free conference planning printable to assist you with your conferences this year.

These tips and printable come from retired teacher Nancy.

CONFERENCE HINTS

Here are a few things to think about for conferences that I did as much for me as for the parents.

*I would have the classroom staged for a regular day of learning, objectives up, schedules, examples of work, spelling/vocabulary lists, etc. so the parents have a better idea of what their child’s day looks like.  You want parents to see the richness of the learning environment.  Textbooks can be set in the hall so those parents waiting have an opportunity to look at them.  (Make sure you have “big-people” chairs available!)

*I would work from an uncluttered table or group of desks and sit on the same side as the parents – no table or desk separating us.

*I would have a small bouquet of flowers or a scented candle on it.  Can you light a candle in the schools anymore?

*I would have a small bowl of treats available, pumpkin jelly beans, apple slices, banana bread, or something similar this time of year.

*I would have soft (elevator?) music playing in the background.

*I would seldom have all of the brightest lights on.

In other words, I would set the stage for a relaxed, enjoyable time of sharing with the parents.

 

Here is a free printable to help organize your conferences.

FREE Printable Parent - Teacher Conference Planning Paper

FREE PRINTABLE – Conference Planning Paper

Rationale for Conference Notes

  1. Parents appreciate the obvious time and effort you spent focusing on their child
  2. You come across as being very prepared, very professional
  3. Allows you to look at the whole child instead of just the academic grades
  4. Allows you to be in charge of the conference instead of the report card
  5. Allows you to prioritize your message to the parents in the time allotted for each conference
  6. Gives you a format for taking notes during the conference
  7. Gives you a format for noting those things you told the attendees you would follow through with
  8. Easy to hang on to these from conference to conference – I would save them for a year so that I would have information to share with next year’s teacher if necessary

Do you have any other conference tips that could help other teachers?  I would like to hear them.  Please comment below to share your ideas with other teachers.

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Related Posts:

Parent Tips For Parent-Teacher Conferences

Getting Involved In Your Child’s School

Communicating With Your Child’s Teacher

How To Request A Learning Disability Test For Your Child

What is Common Core? (Common Core Part 1)

Preparing Your Child For The First Day Of School

How To Request A Learning Disability Test For Your Child

How To Request A Learning Disability Test For Your Child

If it seems your child is falling behind in school and is having a hard time understanding what is being taught, meet with your child’s teacher to determine what could be done to help. Often, additional help or accommodations are all that is needed to help your child be successful in school. A teacher may also ask to begin the RTI process for your child if other ways to help are not working. This means that the teacher, you, and other school personnel will meet together throughout the year to monitor the progress of your child and discuss further accommodations. Sometimes this may be an extra math or reading class, one-on-one time, or modifications. If these ideas do not work, and the school personnel think your child may qualify, your child could be tested for a learning disability. Click here to see the full RTI Process.

There may be a time when you feel your child needs to be tested for a learning disability sooner than later. If this is the case, there are legal rights that parents have to get their child tested sooner. According to the IDEA regulations, a parent may request an initial evaluation to determine if the child is a child with a disability.

IDEA Regulations (from idea.ed.gov):

1. Add a provision regarding initiation of a request for initial evaluation. Consistent with the consent requirements in 34 CFR 300.300, either a parent of a child or a public agency may initiate a request for an initial evaluation to determine if the child is a child with a disability.
[34 CFR 300.301(b)] [20 U.S.C. 1414(a)(1)(B)]

Find a sample letter to request testing here: Learning Disabilities Association of America (page 2).
Send the letter to the school district office and your child’s principal. Make sure to have it sent by certified mail or have it date stamped and signed for when delivering it. If your child attends a private school, IDEA says to send the letter to the district’s special education director in the district of the private school (as opposed to the district where you live).

According to Dr. Larry Silver from LDA, if your child is homeschooled, meet with the principal of the school he or she would attend if in public school and request in writing that your child be tested for a possible learning disability.  The principal is required to have the school psychologist and possible other learning disability specialists review the request for testing.  It is possible they may do a screening test before the full test.  If the principal does not give the request to the school psychologist, you can file a complaint with the Board of Education.  More information can be found at Learning Disabilities Association of America and the Homeschool Legal Defense Association.

The school district must perform the evaluation within a timely matter.

2. Add a 60-day timeline to complete initial evaluation (unless the state has an established timeline).The initial evaluation:
Must be conducted within 60 days of receiving parental consent for the evaluation or, if the State establishes a timeframe within which the evaluation must be conducted, within that timeframe; and
• Must consist of procedures to determine if the child is a child with a disability under 34
CFR 300.8 and to determine the educational needs of the child.
[34 CFR 300.301(c)] [20 U.S.C. 1414(a)(1)(C)]

The 60 day timeline is a federal recommendation. Check with the state department of education under the Division of Special Education to find out the timeline for your state.

If your child is tested and the district says they do not qualify for special education services, you still have rights. Visit Learning Disabilities Association of America for more information.

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Related Posts:

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension?

Reading Test For My Child

Helping Your Child With Math

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Parent Tips For Parent-Teacher Conferences

THFP Archive: Preparing Your Child For The First Day Of School

Preparing Your Child For The First Day Of School - Tips To Make The First Day A Success - From TeacherHelpForParents.com

Right now, teachers are prepping their classrooms for the first day of school. They are cleaning, organizing, and setting up their rooms. They are meeting with other teachers and specialists, making lesson plans, and mapping out the school year. They are doing all of this so that your children’s school year can be the most successful it can be. Parents can also help to create a successful school year for their children with these back to school tips.

1. When class lists are posted, look over the names to see which of your children’s friends are in their classes. Set up a playdate or get together with at least one of the other students before the school year begins. You can also include a classmate or two that your child does not know yet so that they can make a new friend. Just make sure the playdate doesn’t consist of three people. It’s too easy for two of the children to pair off leaving the third child alone. Getting together with classmates before the school year begins helps to alleviate some of the first day jitters. Your children can look for their friends when they get to school or even have a meeting place set up ahead of time. One of the most nervous times for children is walking in for that first moment on the first day of school. This plan will help to ease that nervousness.

2. Pack your children’s backpacks (or have your children pack them) the night before at the latest. This will ease first day stresses and will ensure nothing is forgotten. Lay out the first day of school outfits the night before. This saves any “crisis” the next morning of missing socks, shoes, etc. Go over anything your children may need to remember the night before as well as the next morning. Who is picking your children up from school, or what arrangements have been made for them after school? What time will your children need to be ready in the morning in order to arrive to school on time? Will your children be bringing or buying lunches? Reviewing these things the night before will help ease any anxiety of how the day will run for your children.

3. If you are going in with your children on the first day to meet the teacher, here are some things to help make it a successful experience. Teachers enjoy meeting parents, finding out about their new students, and learning of any special requirements a child may need. If you need to tell the teacher about a special requirement for your child (such as bladder needs, vision, hearing, etc), it’s a good idea to write it on a piece of paper or index card to hand to the teacher after you tell him or her. Include your child’s name, your name, and the need. This helps the teacher. There’s a lot happening on the first day, and this makes it easier for the teacher to help your child.

4. When you see your children for the first time after their first day of school, make it a special time if possible. Go out for a treat. Take a walk to the park. Anything you can think of to provide full attention to your children as they tell you all the details of their first day of school.

Here’s to a great school year!

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Related Posts:

Getting Involved In Your Child’s School

Communicating With Your Child’s Teacher

Getting Your Child Ready For Kindergarten

More Related Posts:
Free Lunch Box Notes
When Should My Child Start Kindergarten?
How To Use Twitter To Improve Your Child’s Education
(Includes Education Chat Times and Education Hashtags List)

How To Use Twitter To Improve Your Child’s Education

How To Use Twitter To Improve Your Child's Education - Includes Printable Education Chat Times and Education Hashtags


Within the past year, I made my journey into the world of Twitter.  I was pleasantly surprised at the large community of educators and parents that make up many Twitter groups.  I found resources, articles, and ideas that support education.  I also found chats for parents and teachers together, grade levels, subject areas, and many more.  How can all of this improve your child’s education?  Here are some ideas.

1.  Join a chat.  At first, it can be a little intimidating.  You can just sit back and read all the good ideas that are being shared.  When you feel ready, jump in and add your own comments and questions.  Some people enjoy using Tweet Chat to help follow the chat.

My absolutely favorite Twitter chat is #ptchat (Parent-Teacher Chat).  This chat is made up of teachers, parents, students, and administrators.  Different topics are discussed each week.  Everyone’s voice is heard.  You can find archives of past chats and a calendar of upcoming chats here.

Here is a list of other chats that you may enjoy following as well.  You can find a complete list of weekly education chats and hashtags here.

Education Twitter Chat Times

 (Printable Education Twitter Chat Times)

#ptchat Parent-Teacher Chat Wednesdays 9-10pm   EST
#kinderchat Kindergarten and Early Childhood Chat Mondays 9-10pm EST
#1stchat First Grade Teachers Chat Sundays 8-9pm EST
#2ndchat Second Grade Teachers Chat Wednesdays 8-9pm EST
#3rdchat Third Grade Teachers Chat* Wednesdays 7-8pm EST (2nd   Wednesdays of each month)
#4thchat Fourth Grade Teachers Chat Mondays 8-9pm EST
#5thchat 5th grade Teachers Chat Tuesdays 8-9pm EST
#6thchat 6th Grade Chat Tuesdays 9-10pm EST
#6thchat 6th grade teachers Chat Thursdays 8-9pm EST
#mschat Middle School Chat Thursdays 8-9pm EST
#midleved Middle Level (middle schools) Fridays 8-9pm EST
#hsmath High School Math Chat Tuesdays 9:30-10:30pm EST
#mathchat Math Teachers Chat Mondays 3:30-5:00pm EST
#engchat English Teachers Chat Mondays 7-8pm EST
#sschat Social Studies Teachers Chat Mondays 7-8pm EST
#scichat Science Teachers Chat Tuesdays 9-10pm EST
#slpchat Speech and Language Pathologists Sundays 2-3pm EST
#spedchat Special Education Chat Tuesdays 9-10pm EST
#ellchat English Language Learners Chat Mondays 9-10pm EST
#gtchat Gifted and Talented Chat Fridays 12-1pm & 7-8pm   EST
#stuvoice Student Voice Mondays 8:30-9:30pm EST

Some chats are “attended” more than others and meet consistently.

2.  Visit Education Hashtags

Even if you can’t make it to the chat, you can always view the hashtag at other times to find good ideas and to ask your own questions directly to teachers.

Here are a list of popular education hashtags:

Education Hashtags

(Printable Education Hashtags List)

#preschool #arted
#kindergarten #artsed
#kinderchat #earlyed (early education)
#1stchat #edapp & #edapps (educational apps)
#2ndchat #edchat
#3rdchat #elemchat
#4thchat #kidlit (literacy for kids)
#5thchat #rwworksop (reading/writing workshop)
#6thchat #speced (special education)
#midlevel (middle school) #spedchat (special education chat)
#mschat (middle school) #dylexia
#hschat (high school) #specialneeds
#reading #bilingual
#phonics #autism
#spelling #gifted
#math #gtchat (gifted and talented chat)
#fractions #pechat
#measurement #homeschool
#science #homeschooling
#writing #hs (homeschool)
#grammar #STEM (Science,Technology,Engineering, Math)
#literacy #ACT
#geography #SAT
#biology #scholarship
#science #histedchat (history chat)
#physics #sschat (social studies chat)
#chemistry #musedchat (music chat)

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Related Posts:
What is Common Core? (Common Core Part 1)
Preparing Your Child For The First Day Of School
Parent Tips For Parent-Teacher Conferences
How To Have A Successful Parent – Teacher Conference (Free Conference Planning Printable)
Getting Involved In Your Child’s School
Communicating With Your Child’s Teacher
How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?
How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension?
Motivating Your Child To Read
Reading Test For My Child
Helping Your Child With Math

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10 Thoughtful Teacher Appreciation Gifts

10 Thoughtful Teacher Appreciation Gifts


Teacher Appreciation Week is the first full week of May.  Teacher gifts to show appreciation do not need to cost a lot of money or any money at all.  They are just something to say thank you to teachers for teaching and caring for your child.  Here are some thoughtful teacher appreciation gift ideas for this week, the end of the school year, or anytime during the year.

1.  One year, my class gave me an apron (shown above) with every child’s name on it written with fabric paint.  It was perfect to wear each year when the class was doing art or a messy activity.

2.  Another year, a parent had each child write their name on a vase.  She then took it to a paint your own pottery store, and they glazed it for her.  She presented the vase full of beautiful flowers.

3.  Plants are a wonderful idea.  I enjoyed planting the potted flowers and plants I would receive in my yard.  They are now a great reminder to me of the wonderful students I have had over the years.

4.  I had some students over the years give me a picture that was taken of the two of us on the first day of school.  Sometimes they would write a kind note with it, frame it, or place a magnet on the back.

5.  Is your child’s teacher a sports fan?  Grab a football, basketball, soccer ball, or volleyball and have the class sign it.  The teacher will enjoy displaying it in his or her classroom.  Want to make it more individualized?  Have your child write a special message on a baseball or softball.

6.  A great idea for a beginning teacher is to have students write messages about what they appreciate about the teacher.  Place these messages and pictures into a photo album with extra blank pages left for her or him to add more pictures and messages in the years to come.

7.  Teachers appreciate gift cards.  You can make it more personalized by picking a store or restaurant they enjoy.  Gift cards do not have to cost a lot of money.  A $5.00 gift card to Starbucks will bring a smile to many teachers’ faces!

8.  When dropping off your child at the beginning of the day, why not bring the teacher a latte or another favorite drink?  I know of many teachers that have appreciated this over the years.

9.  Bringing your child’s teacher lunch from their favorite eatery is a wonderful idea that teachers like.

10.  One of my all time favorite teacher appreciation gifts, is a letter from the child and/or parent telling me thank you.  I have kept every single one of these letters and still enjoy reading them.

Remember teacher appreciation gifts aren’t about how much you spend, they are just a way to tell your child’s teacher thank you and that they are appreciated.

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Related Posts:

Getting Involved In Your Child’s School

Communicating With Your Child’s Teacher

Free Lunch Box Notes

Parent Tips For Parent-Teacher Conferences

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Common Core: What Does My Child Need To Know? (Common Core Part 3)

Common Core - What Does My Child Need To Know


Common Core is the national education objectives that are currently in many states.  (See which ones here).  We have discussed What is Common Core? How will it affect my child?  and What can I do to prepare my child for Common Core?  We also have posted sample test questions for the new assessment.  In this part of our Common Core series, we are answering the question: What does my child need to know for Common Core?

Each grade level has certain things they need to know at that grade level in math and English Language Arts/Literacy.  The Common Core tests began in the 2014-2015 school year.  Below you will find parent-friendly versions of the English Language Arts/Literacy objectives for grades kindergarten – fifth grade.

I have updated this section of the post.

Parent-Friendly Standards From April Wulber.

*Want to know if your state is participating in Common Core?  Check out the end of the post: What is Common Core? to see if your state is listed.

To see the Common Core standards in their entirety, please visit corestandards.org.

More Resources

What Is Common Core? (parent-friendly)

Common Core Practice Test


Common Core Sample Test Questions


Parent-Friendly Middle School and High School Common Core Standards


Free Common Core Teaching Resources

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Related Posts:
What is Common Core? (Common Core Part 1)
Common Core Sample Test Questions (Common Core Part 2)
FREE Common Core Teaching Resources
Middle School And High School Kid Friendly Common Core Standards

Reading Assessment For My Child
Increasing Critical Thinking Skills Through Brain Teasers
Online Reading Games for Preschool Through Second Grade
How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?
High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Practice Online