FREE Printable Short E Word List

FREE PRINTABLE Short E Word List - From TeacherHelpForParents.com




Below is a list of short e words. Begin by writing the words on index cards. Continue practicing with your child until he or she can say the words accurately. Mix the cards up each time to further help with reading practice.

Once your child can read the words on the index cards, print out this list of words. Start by reading the list to him or her. Then, have your child read with you. Finally, have your child read independently. The goal is for your child to be able to read each list in under one minute.

Short E Practice

Bet Beg Bent Cent
Desk Fed Felt Get
Help Kept Let Nest
Peg Rent Sell Tent
Vest Well Trend Mess
Egg Elf Elk Ten
Led Best Pen Vet
Bell Leg Pet Web
Best Red West Men
End Met Sent Wet
Jet Nest Shed Sled

Printable Short E Word List

Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Related Posts: How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?
Motivating Your Child To Read
Short A Practice
Short I Practice
Short O Practice
Short U Practice
Long A Words
Long E Words
Long I Words

 

Olympics Kids Activities

Olympics Kids Activities




Celebrate the summer Olympics with these kid-friendly ideas.

Olympic Handprint Rings
Olympic Handprint Rings

Your child uses his or her thumb and index finger to create this masterpiece (from Activity Village).

teddy bear olympicsTeddy Bear Olympics

Why not have your children gather up their teddy bears and have their own Olympics?
Here are some ideas to get you started (from Sun Hats & Wellie Boots).

USA star matching game

USA Star Matching Game

This matching game is perfect for preschoolers and kindergartners (from Little Family Fun).

The Ancient Greek Olympics

This site is perfect for elementary and middle school students.
It explains the origin and history of the Olympics (from Mr. Donn’s Site for Kids & Teachers).

Click here to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Gardening With Your Child

How To Start A Garden With Your Child


Guest Post By Megan Neary

There are few things as rewarding as gardening with your child! The educational and nutritional opportunities are endless. Teaching your child where food comes from is a powerful lesson. Here are a few things to consider before planning your garden!

Think about the size of your garden. When you are just beginning a new garden it is best to start small. Have a plan in mind to expand your garden after you have completed a growing season. If the thought of removing sod for an in ground garden is overwhelming, consider starting a container or raised bed garden.

Be sure to include your child in this process! Have them help you measure out the plot of land you have in mind. If you are doing a raised bed garden they can help you measure where it will be placed in your yard. When buying containers talk to your child about the various sizes and why certain crops need larger containers to grow in.

The second thing to consider is sun exposure. It is important to choose an area for your garden that gets full sun exposure. Vegetables love sun and the more they have the better! This is a great opportunity to talk to your child about what plants need in order to survive. Have your child help you pick an area of your yard that would be a good spot to grow crops. Choose a day where you and your child can check on the amount of sun your yard gets. Are there spots that receive morning sun but afternoon shade? Work with your child to decide the best spot for your garden to thrive!

Next, think about the type of soil you have in your area. Rocky soil is hard to cultivate so a raised bed or container garden might be better if you have this type of soil. Find a spot in your yard and dig a hole with your child. Talk with them about the type of soil you have and the type of garden that would work best for your location.

Next, think about how you will maintain your garden. Consider how much time you are willing to put into your garden. Will you be able to water it each day in the summer? How often will you and your child be able to pick the crops you are growing? Be honest and realistic about the amount of time you can put into your garden. Many gardens start with a bang but then wither away under the intense August heat. Successful gardens are those in which irrigation and maintenance are carefully thought out. Can you tie your garden into an existing sprinkler system? Think about buying a hose that is set up with a timer to ensure your garden will receive the correct amount of water to keep it alive and well! Sit down with your child and develop a watering plan for the summer. Consider also adding it to your child’s chore list. A garden is a great way to instill responsibility in a child but be sure to include them in the process!

Finally, the fun part! Take your child with you to pick out the seeds you would like to plant. Be honest about what vegetables your family eats. In my own garden I grow the crops I know my children will consume. Think about your space constraints as well. Certain crops such as pumpkins need lots of space to grow. Involve your child in the process and ask them what types of vegetables they’d like to grow. Once you have decided on your crops, work together to plant the seeds. Be sure to follow the planting directions on the package!

Gardening with your child is a rewarding experience. Few things are as powerful as teaching our children where food comes from! Happy Gardening!

Megan has been teaching for 16 years. She has extended her love of gardening to her school where they have started their own garden.

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Related Posts:
Science Fair Help
High Level Math, Science, and Test Prep Help Online
Increasing Critical Thinking Skills Through Brain Teasers

Visit Our Pinterest Science Board For Many Fun Science Activities

FREE PRINTABLE Short A Word List

FREE PRINTABLE Short A Word List - From TeacherHelpForParents.com




Below is a list of short a words. Begin by writing the words on index cards. Continue practicing with your child until he or she can say the words accurately. Mix the cards up each time to further help with reading practice.

Once your child can read the words on the index cards, print out this list of words. Start by reading the list to him or her. Then, have your child read with you. Finally, have your child read independently. The goal is for your child to be able to read each list in under one minute.

Short A Practice

Back Bad Band Bat
Cap Dad Fact Hand
Land Mask Pack Pan
Pat Patch Sack Van
Wax Act Add As
Ask At Ax Am
Ant Back Bag Bat
Cab Camp Can Cat
Fan Gal Gas Had
Ham Hat Jam Lamp
Mad Man Map Mat
Nap Pad Pal Pat
Ran Rat Sad Sand
Sat Tab Tack Tan
Tap Van Yam Bag
Plan Than That Scat
Chat Flag Ants Champ

Printable Short A Practice

Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Related Posts: How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?Sight Words Your Child Needs To Know (Dolch Sight Words)More Sight Words Your Child Needs To Know (Ekwall Sight Words)
Short E Practice
Short I Practice
Short O Practice
Short U Practice
Long A Word List
Long E Word List
Long I Word List
Long U Word List

Making Leprechaun Traps – Free Letter From A Leprechaun

 

Leprechaun Traps and a Free Letter From a Leprechaun




Leprechaun Traps & a Free Letter From a Leprechaun

Leprechaun Trap Idea Picture

Those silly leprechauns. They love to cause mischief especially on St. Patrick’s Day. Some people have awoken to find green footprints spread around their house, confetti strewn everywhere, and their breakfast turned green! If only we could figure out a way to catch them.

It will take some reasoning skills to do it, but I think it can be done. We can build leprechaun traps. Leprechauns love shiny objects, gold, silver, rainbows, coins (real, paper, or chocolate), four leaf clovers, and riddles. It’s best to camouflage the trap so the leprechauns can’t see it. You can use a cardboard box, net, or old cans. Whatever you use, your imagination is the most important element in catching a leprechaun.

Parents, here is a fun letter from a leprechaun that you can leave by the trap in the morning for your child to find.

Leprechaun Traps Letter From A LeprechaunView Printable Leprechaun Letter

Thank you to my friend Wendy for the picture of the leprechaun trap.

I would be happy to post a picture of your child’s leprechaun trap. Please send the picture to contact @ teacherhelpforparents . com

Martha Stewart Leprechaun TrapEven Martha Stewart made a leprechaun trap.  Check it out.

Leprechaun Trap CakeHave you seen the leprechaun trap cakes?  A yummy take on the traditional trap.  This one is from notmartha.org.

Thank you to Ellen Byron for telling me about Martha Stewart’s leprechaun trap and the leprechaun trap cakes.

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Related Posts:

Writing: St. Patrick’s Day Limericks – Free Printable

Mother’s Day Poem Heart Card – Free Brainstorming Printable

Mother’s Day Card Ideas

Father’s Day Card Ideas

Father’s Day Writing Activity: My Dad News – Free Printable

FREE Grade Level Reading Test

FREE Grade Level Reading Test


Are you wondering at which grade level your child reads? The best way to find this out is through your child’s teacher. If you homeschool, it’s summer vacation, or you just want to test for yourself, I have found an assessment that you can use from the National Right to Read Foundation. It tests both phonics and reading grade level. You can find it here. The link here and below has both the assessment and instructions for administering the test. It can give you a good idea at which grade level your child reads best from first grade through sixth grade.

Why is it important to know the grade level at which your child reads? Your child needs to be reading material that is not too easy and at the same time isn’t so hard that it is frustrating. When it is too easy, your child doesn’t have as much opportunity to improve. When it is too hard, your child can become frustrated and comprehension is reduced significantly.

Once you find out your child’s reading level, check out my post about motivating your child to read. It includes book series appropriate for each grade level. I also have posts for increasing your child’s reading speed and expression and how to help your child become a better reader.

Use This Test To Find Our Your Child’s Reading Level:
Phonics and Grade Level Reading Assessment

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Related Posts:
Motivating Your Child To Read
Reading Fluency: Increasing Speed and Expression
How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?
How To Use Reading Baskets At Home
Short Vowels Practice Word Lists
Sight Words Your Child Needs To Know
More Sight Words Your Child Needs To Know

Volunteering at Your Children’s School

Volunteering at Your Children's School - Benefits for you and your children

A great way to help your children be successful in school is to get involved in their classrooms. It not only shows your children that you care about their education, but it also gives you a peek into their school world. You will be able to see first hand how they relate to peers and their teachers, contribute to discussions, and complete their assignments. It also gives you common ground with your children for when they talk about their day at school with you. When they mention a particular friend or procedure in the classroom, chances are you will know exactly what they are talking about. Just your presence will be appreciated by them.

If you are unable to go to your children’s classrooms to help due to work or other commitments, there are other ways you can get involved. See if there is a project such as correcting papers, cutting, gluing, etc that you can do at home. Your children could bring home the projects and then return them to school the next day. Chances are they will be full of pride as they hand the projects to their teachers knowing it was their parent who helped. Another way to get involved if you cannot make it during the school day is before or after school. Teachers need help with music programs, skate nights, movie nights, and other special times. You can also find out when your PTA, PTSA, or PTO meets. Some parent associations schedule meetings at lunch time or in the evening to give as many parents as possible a chance to get involved. Even if you cannot make it directly into your children’s classrooms during the school day to help, there are other ways you can can be involved.

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Related Posts:

Preparing Your Child For The First Day Of School

When Should My Child Start Kindergarten?

Getting Your Child Ready For Kindergarten

Communicating With Your Child’s Teacher: How To Get Your Child’s Needs Met

10 Thoughtful Teacher Appreciation Gifts

Parent Tips For Parent-Teacher Conferences

Picture font by http://bythebutterfly.com.

FREE Summer Reading Programs for Kids 2015 And FREE Digital Books For Your Children

Free Summer Reading Programs For Kids

Find FREE Digital Books For Your Children

Did you know many libraries now offer digital collections of electronic and audio books for your computer, MP3 player, iPod, Smartphone, or tablet?*

You can find hundreds of free online children’s books by visiting your library’s website and clicking on TumbleBooks (TM). If you have a preschooler or beginning reader, be sure to visit DayByDayID.org every day this summer to read books and do fun activities.* Make sure you access TumbleBooks through your library’s site so you can read them for free.

Free 2015 Summer Reading Programs

School is out and summer fun has begun. It’s important to remember during these summer months to spend at least a little time in academics. Most students loose a bit of what was learned during the past year in the summer months. One way to help your child retain what was learned and be better prepared for the upcoming school year is to participate in a summer reading program. Some free summer reading programs are listed below.

City Libraries: Every Hero Has A Story – Read books and complete activities to receive free books, coloring stickers, and more. Most libraries are participating in this event.  Check your local library for details.

American Girl Read-A-Palooza – American Girl stores are hosting this free reading event until August 26th. The American Girl site has the schedule of store events as well as free printables.

Barnes and Noble – Your child can earn a free book when they read any eight books, record them on the provided reading journal, and bring it into Barnes and Noble.

Pottery Barn Kids Weekly Story Time– Story time is Tuesdays from 11:00 – 11:30 a.m. Your child can receive a special gift for attending five story times when they become a book club member.

Chuck E. Cheese – Print off their reading calendar. Once your child reads for two weeks, they earn 10 free tokens. They also have other reward calendars such as homework, good behavior, and practicing a musical instrument. All of the calendars are for two weeks and are for 10 free tokens.

Showcase Cinemas Bookworm Wednesdays – From July 9th to August 13th, children can bring in a book report to the Bookworm Wednesdays 10:00 a.m. movie and watch it for free. Download the Book Report

TD Bank – Children in kindergarten – 5th grade can read and record 10 books on the summer reading form, take the form to TD Bank, and receive a $10 deposit into a new or existing Young Saver Account. This program is through August 31st.

Pizza Hut Book It Summer Reading Program – Students kindergarten – sixth grade have the chance to win Book It prizes if they read 5 books by August 15th.  This program runs June 22nd – August 15th.

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Related Posts:

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader?

How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension? (Free Reading Comprehension Printables)

Motivating Your Child To Read

How To Use Reading Baskets At Home

How To Learn With Placemats: Using Placemats For No Pressure Learning

*Information from the public library summer reading pamphlet.

Picture font by http://bythebutterfly.com.

Mother’s Day Poems – FREE PRINTABLE

Mother's Day Tissue Paper Heart Poems With FREE PRINTABLE from TeacherHelpForParents.com

I like the idea of combining creative writing and art to make a Mother’s Day card.

To begin, use the brainstorming sheet below to come up with special attributes of your mother.

Mother's Day Poem Heart Card Brainstorming SheetPrintable Mother’s Day Poem Heart Card Brainstorming Sheet

Next, cross out the typed lines that were given on the paper as seen below. The words that you wrote become your poem.

Mother's Day Poem Heart Card Brainstorming Sheet 2

Click Here For A Larger View

Cut out a heart from your mother’s favorite color of construction paper. Use a ruler to draw lines across the middle of the heart. Write your poem on these lines.

Mother's Day Poem Heart Card 1

Cut your mother’s favorite color of tissue paper into squares. Wrap one square at a time around the end of a pencil, dip it into glue, and place it on your heart to create a border.

Mother's Day Poem Heart Card 2

After your tissue paper border is complete, allow the heart to dry.

Mother's Day Poem Heart Card 7

Click here to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Related Posts:
Mother’s Day Card Ideas
Father’s Day Card Ideas
Father’s Day Writing Activity: My Dad News – Free Printable
Thanksgiving Poetry -Free Printables
St. Patrick’s Day Limericks – Free Printable

Picture font by http://bythebutterfly.com.

 

4 Steps To Help Your Child Become A Better Reader

How Do I Help My Child Become A Better Reader - 4 Steps To Help Your Child Become A Better Reader - From TeacherHelpForParents.com

One of the questions I have been asked the most as a teacher is, “How do I help my child become a better reader?” Successful readers do four things: sound out words, read fluently, comprehend what they are reading, and love to read.

Step One – Word Attack
It is important for your child to be able to recognize letters and sounds. Phonics and sight words are a large part of this step. I have posted phonetic sight word lists, Dolch sight word lists, and Ekwall sight word lists for your child to practice. Once your child knows the patterns and sight words, it’s time for him or her to move on to step two.

Step Two – Fluency
In this step, your child will put together the words and sounds they have learned to read passages. It’s best for them to start with phrases, such as Fry’s Phrases, and then move on to full passages.

Step Three – Comprehension
Once your child can read fluently at their grade level, it’s time for them to move on to comprehension. I have a full article about how to improve your child’s reading comprehension here. It also includes free reading comprehension printables.

Step Four – Love of Reading
The final step is the most rewarding. Once your child can read stories at his or her grade level and understand what is being read, fostering a love of reading is a must. One way I have done this in my own classroom, is by reading from a series. Once children are comfortable with that series, they are more likely to read it on their own. Find ways to motivate your child to read and favorite reading series by age group here.

Click here to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Related Posts:
How Can I Help My Child With Reading Comprehension (Free Reading Comprehension Printables)
How Do I Motivate My Child To Read?
Reading Fluency: Increasing Speed and Expression
How To Request A Learning Disability Test For Your Child

Subscribe For Free Updates to Teacher Help For Parents

Enter your email address:Delivered by FeedBurner